"The famous artist steps to the mirrors."

Translation:A híres művésznő a tükrökhöz lép.

August 5, 2016

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krisbaudi

Der berühmte Artist tritt zu den Spiegeln. It sounds quite normal in German and in English it is the same. But still it sounds strange to me, because I get the picture in my mind, that the Artist is stepping (step dancing) to the mirrors. :-)

August 13, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

Er ist in diesem Fall allerdings kein Artist, sondern ein Künstler. :)
Der (Zirkus-)Artist ist artista.

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Krisbaudi

Oh je.............

September 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

This lesson, I swear... how many of the sentences are actually well translated, do you think? 50%?

Regardless of whether or not there's extra meaning in the Hungarian sentence, it's not being communicated with just to. No one says "step to" - except, according to Wiktionary, in AAVE slang.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

Totally agreed. So, what is the best natural alternative? We need to step up to the plate and keep reporting them.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

It depends on what the sentence is actually trying to get across. One idea would be "The famous artists steps towards the mirrors". Or perhaps it means "The famous artist steps to face the mirrors" (in which case to becomes part of an infinitive, rather than a preposition). I think this is what it's trying to get across based on explanations people have given for other sentences, but I'd need a native Hungarian speaker to confirm it.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

Well, actually, it is neither. "Towards" is "felé". "A tükrök felé". That is just a directional indicator. You could be miles away from the mirrors. "Tükrökhöz" is up to the close vicinitiy of the mirrors.
And to "face" the mirrors is "szembeállni a tükrökkel". The closest I can think of is "step up to". Basically, indicating the last step with which you arrive at a position at the mirrors. Step up to the mirrors.
The exact location around the mirrors or the orientation of the person is not indicated but, of course, naturally one would stand in front of a mirror facing it.
So, my vote is "step up to".

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

It still sounds slightly weird to me, but I think that's mostly because the only mirrors I've ever seen are either hand mirrors or big ones mounted on the wall - not large, free-standing mirrors, so the idea of stepping up to a mirror is somewhat foreign to me. Nevertheless, "step up to" definitely makes sense, is grammatically correct, and would be generally a HUGE improvement to the current sentence, so I'll cast my vote in with yours. :)

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

I should run for office. :)
So, how is it foreign to you if the mirror is on the wall and you step up to it? The Hungarian sentence does not indicate the type of the mirrors whatsoever. The mirrors could be a bunch of hand mirrors lying on the bed and the artist could "step to" them. The Hungarian sentence would be exactly the same.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

@vvsey: No, I understand what "step up to" means; I might, for instance, say something like "I stepped up to the ticket counter at the airport" or "he stepped up to the double doors of the courthouse". The reason it doesn't sound right to me is that counters and doors are both things you'd actually have to get up close and personal with to interact with them, whereas a mirror typically isn't, so it doesn't fit within my mental categorization as nice as I might like. But if that's what the Hungarian sentence means, that's what it means, and I can't think of a better translation than "step up to" without making the sentence really awkwardly long: He took steps such that the last step that he took resulted in his being directly in front of the mirror.

Although, you mentioned "walking over to" the gum on the sidewalk - I think "step over to the mirror" would also work here, although most people would probably just say "walk over to the mirror"

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

@vvsey: I can't put my finger on why exactly... hand mirrors, you "pick up", and wall-mounted mirrors - well, you don't really do anything to them; they're just kind of there in front of you, and are typically big enough that you don't have to step up to them. (I'm thinking bathroom mirrors here) Free-standing mirrors would have to be stepped up to (sidenote: I'm not sure I've ever used the passive voice with "step" before...), but I've never come across them, which I guess is why it seems foreign. The sentence you provided is correct, though, despite whether it seems foreign to me or not.

August 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

@Arcaeca: Then you are probably still a bit confused about what "a tükrökhöz lép" means, and "step up to" may not be the best translation after all.
It means absolutely nothing else but a movement to the target object, that is, the completion of it. I could see a used chewing gum on the sidewalk and walk over to it. That is it, nothing else is implied. When I am done, I am next to the chewing gum. Or the mirrors in this case. That's it.

August 5, 2016

[deactivated user]

    I would say 'steps closer to the mirror', which is strictly 'közelebb lép a tükörhöz', but at least makes sense both in hungarian and in english i think.

    September 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Toneaasgaard

    My answer should be accepted

    February 5, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

    I hope you reported it, then. Else there's no way to know what answer you gave.
    You're also free to share it here so we can dicuss it if you like. :)

    February 5, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fischerfs

    Why can't 'művész' be used?

    August 17, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

    It can and should. Please report it if it's missing.

    August 21, 2017
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