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  5. "Je bois du lait."

"Je bois du lait."

Translation:I drink milk.

February 2, 2013

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dena_hawkins

why is it du and not de


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"je bois du lait" means I am drinking some milk, ie an undefined quantity of something I cannot count.

In French, there is a specific construction for that: preposition "de" + definite article "le/la"

-masculine: du lait (contraction of de+le)

-feminine: de la soupe

-masculine: de l'alcool (elision of "le" because alcool starts with a vowel)

  • feminine: de l'eau (elision "la" because eau starts with a vowel)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KhamariCotton

Sitesurf I love ya


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maitreyee.K

explained very nicely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan836179

Me too i love ya Sitesurf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James920058

Everyone loves Sitesurf!!! (Apart from me) ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I'm sorry to read this. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Billsonss

Sitesurf you are an absolute legend! Your explanations are always so thorough and yet easy to understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"de" is simply a particle meaning "of", or "from", it's not the use there.

You have to put the partitive article, and it's always de+ definite article.

There's an exception with "du" (because it's the contraction of de+le) and with "des" (because it's the contraction of de+les)

Remember: "de" alone is a particle, not an article, to mean the partitive article, you need the whole block "de"+definite article, or the contracted forms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"de" is a preposition (like "pour", "à", "sans"...) to link elements of a sentence together.

"de" is called "a particle" (une particule) when used in aristocrats' family names: Edmond de Rothschild, for example (= Van in Dutch and Von in German).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rysid

you're always so helpful! thanks! PS heres a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NellaLaBella

Why is "je bois le lait" incorrect? "I drink the milk in the morning" is proper grammar. All this time they make us say irregular stuff like "she eat the apple" no "s" yet I drink the milk is wrong? Hmmm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/so_normal

In filling the blank in "Je bois __ lait: wouldn't it also be correct to say "I drink the milk/ Je bois le lait" as well as using "du lait"? Aren't both technically correct?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Did you really get a "fill-in the blank" exercise with "je bois ___ lait"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bgmjoyce

i wrote i drink milk but should it be i drink some milk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. "I drink some milk" or "I drink milk", both mean an indefinite quantity of milk, and have the same French translation = "Je bois du lait".

The "some" is optional in English, but it can help you to translate the French partitive, de la, du, des, etc...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamishiiKaku

'du' is 'some' when placed in front of 'of the'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

"Du" is some each time you mean an indefinite quantity (nothing to do with "of the", because it's not the way it has to translate)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

The pronounciation of "lait" here is wrong. It has to sound like a "è" and not a "è".

http://fr.forvo.com/word/lait/
The right pronounciation is /lɛ/ and not /le/. I'll report.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaShamsili

What is the difference between du and de la?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Serenmyst

Du is masculine. De la is feminine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. Because "du" is indeed the mandatory contraction of "de"+"le", so it's masculine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kellyrahardjaa

Why not du le lait?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"du" already means "de le" (which is not used for phonetic reasons).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/toffee1141

Could it also mean 'I am drinking the milk'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

the milk = le lait

Whenever the English sentence has "the", the French sentence will use "le", "la", "l' " or "les" depending on the noun used:

  • the milk = le lait (masculine singular)
  • the beer = la bière (feminine singular)
  • the water = l'eau (feminine singular, noun starting with a vowel sound)
  • the alcohol = l'alcool (masculine singular, noun starting with a vowel sound)
  • the drinks and the glasses = les boissons (feminine plural) et les verres (masculine plural)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grolix

This is a past tense and it should be drank not drink.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

No, it is not a past tense.

Past tenses would be, for example:

  • j'ai bu (compound past)
  • je buvais (imperfect)
  • j'avais bu (pluperfect)

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avivah4

PERCE_NIEG and Sitesurf, you are SO HELPFUL!!! : )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bhouse113

Why is "Je bois le lait" incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"le" is the translation for "the".

"du" is a partitive article that is required when the English meaning is "some" in front of a masculine mass noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ruthienan

I drink = bois; he drinks = boit?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

je bois, tu bois, il/elle/on boit, nous buvons, vous buvez, ils/elles boivent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pleiadian_

So what would "Je bois lait." mean - that I drink milk in general? Or is that incorrect grammar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"je bois lait" is incorrect because you need an article of some kind: either "le lait" (definite) or "du lait" (partitive)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

You always have to put article in French. Here, the partitive is to mean you have an indefinite quantity of milk ("du")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alphabet03

Can someone give me a 13 year olds answer for when to use du, de, etc? I dont know what definitive articles, particles, etc are. It would truly help me a lot if someone could explain all these things to me in a way I can understand it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Have you read the Tips and Notes in the lesson?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sidebyeach2

The latest change to your web interface is broken. Needed items are off the screen when the browser window maximized and only come back on the screen as one slowly decreases the size of the screen. Then, if you go smaller, needed items are off the screen again. Some times there is a scroll bar to reach items, and sometimes its not present. Please fix. I use firefox on a laptop computer.

Has anyone else experienced these issues. (may 31, 2019)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElenaAbydo

So, how do l say skim or 2% milk in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliZ246754

So in French we drink [from] things, right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

No, not "from"; rather "some of the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KholoudSaid

I wrote "I am drinking milk" and it said incorrect!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

This is what you reported: " I am driving milk"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lechuza-chouette

"I am having milk" sounds close enough to me. Unless the speaker is Cleopatra and her "bains de lait d'ânesse".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Yes. The translation "drinking milk" can be "having milk" in English, since this expression mean "to drink", but in French, "having" is only to own, so it's easier and maybe more simple to translate "boire" with "drink", but it's correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/excellence2018

Not really.

In French:

AVOIR = to have with respect to possession

PRENDRE = to have or to take with respect to ingestion


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SiddharthD193041

Shouldn't it be "I am drinking some milk"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelixNdiuk

'I am drinking some milk' was marked wrong. Why?

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