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"I am not leaving anything."

Translation:No estoy dejando nada.

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion
Albrechtion
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Is there any reason why salir couldn't be used?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

Salir is to go out of a place... but dejar means to leave something behind

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Salir, in the sense of "leave" or "depart," is not a transitive verb (it doesn't take an object). And (as marianne.w4 correctly pointed out) it doesn't have the sense of leaving (an object) or letting, either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Another answer DL gives is 'Yo no dejo nada.'. 'I do not leave anything'. This seems to me a bit different from "I am not leaving anything.' Emphasis on the 'I AM/ESTOY'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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The present indicative in Spanish is often used (perhaps more often than the present progressive) to express what the present progressive expresses in English. So, if you want to say "I am not leaving anything" in Spanish, you could say "No dejo nada" (present indicative) or "No estoy dejando nada" (present progressive).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

How about: "Yo no me voy de nada." Is this also correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HolyT
HolyT
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Irse means to leave, but it's an intransitive verb as far as the English translation is concerned. That is, it doesn't take an object. It's a pronomial verb in Spanish, taking the form of a reflexive verb. The object is the subject.

I've looked up irse de on line and after a brief search the best I've found is this: http://es.thefreedictionary.com/irse. According to this source, it seems that irse de would be leaving something behind, which doesn't quite sound like the English sentence to me.

EDIT: A friend of mine who is a native Spanish speaker and also completely fluent in English has confirmed this. Dejar is appropriate here, not irse.

EDIT: Here's another good source: http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/116091/ir-vs-irse.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdb614

What about "Estoy no dejando nada." What are the rules for where "No" gets placed?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimZTango
JimZTango
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I believe "no" always goes before the verb. Also, I think it is best to avoid splitting the verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billy8195

"Estoy dejando nada" could potentially mean "I leave nothing"... so adding "no" to Estoy could mean "I am not leaving nothing."... Lol

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Except Spanish uses the double-negative, whereas English does not. So, in this case, don't translate literally.

See comments below.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moger777

Why can't quedando work here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BoredWithDuoNow

In every day conversation we try to streamline our sentences, i.e. missing out words but keeping the full meaning intact. Example: "Are you going to leave anything behind?" becomes, "are you leaving anything?", becomes, "leaving anything?" We are being efficient with words and not losing the meaning. I expect every language is the same. Would a Spanish person truncate sentences like the examples I have given? "Estás dejando algo atrás", becomes, "¿Dejando algo?"

1 year ago