"De qui est cette lettre ?"

Translation:From whom is that letter?

2/2/2013, 6:45:45 PM

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rochereine
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cette lettre sounds very run together here. . . is that how it's normally pronounced?

2/2/2013, 6:45:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mcgurker

In spoken French, as in any spoken language, every word runs together. I've found this voice to be, at least sometimes, a pretty good portrayal of spoken French whereas something like the speech on google translate is more for you to HEAR the words, not to practice listening.

3/27/2013, 5:37:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ekzunakka
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I don't think so - I think it's just a poor quality recording.

2/18/2013, 7:00:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/1000mun
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True. This recording needs to be updated.

8/31/2018, 3:14:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackSea
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The audio on Google translate is far superior. Listen to that.

2/23/2013, 3:51:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Susanne118294

Yes! Much better.

7/21/2018, 7:07:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ParoleGramme
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My answer was "whose letter is this?" Should that have been accepted? If not, how would you say that in French?

2/14/2013, 10:43:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/snood1205
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À qui est cette lettre?

2/20/2013, 1:30:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Feferrie

Wouldn't that be "to whom is this letter?"

7/29/2013, 9:57:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/MauroQuil
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No, snood1205 very keenly pointed out that the sentence was specific about the letter's origin, not the letter's owner. When you ask someone about the ownership on something you use "À qui est xoxoxo"

8/28/2013, 11:03:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ParoleGramme
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thanks!

3/19/2013, 10:40:36 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/anamalena
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But i think it should be accepted - the other way to ask who send it is: ''whose letter it is?'' .... if you say for example ''that's Jane's letter'', you don't know whether it is send FROM Jane or send TO Jane - both means that it is Jane's letter. So I think ''whose letter is this'' is perfectly correct.

12/12/2013, 6:19:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/bichomau

But why is "whose"wrong? Thanks

8/26/2014, 11:49:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/BlackHeart01
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I think you are right , it must be accepted because at least your sentence means in spanish "De quien es esta carta?" who's similar to De qui est cette lettre?

11/2/2013, 11:00:57 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Muzorewi1984

I wrote "whom is this letter from" and apparently "whom" is wrong here. Is it? I'm starting to doubt my English now!

3/18/2013, 8:38:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/potato_jam

Whom should only be used when the person in question is the object of the sentence. The way I figure out when to use who/whom is by thinking:

• Who = the person is doing something

• Whom = something is being done to the person

So in this case the person in question has sent the letter. If you wanted to know what person the letter was sent to, you'd ask "To whom was the letter addressed?"

Another way of going about it is to use the he/him trick. If you rephrase the question as a statement would you use he or him? If you use him then you'd use "whom" because it ends in an m. If you use he then you would use "who" because it doesn't have an m. So:

• Who/whom sent the letter?

He sent the letter, so you use "who"

• Who/whom is it addressed to?

It is addressed to him, so you use "whom"

Most people don't really bother with who/whom, they just use "who" by default, which sounds fine.

If you're interested, there is a more in depth explanation here: http://grammar.quickanddirtytips.com/who-versus-whom.aspx

5/29/2013, 9:29:32 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kuchesezik

I see "Whom is that letter from" as the correct response. It is clear that native grammar is somewhat poor.

2/24/2014, 10:35:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/alfiemoon12

I think the whole point of this thread is that we are trying to demonstrate understanding of the French sentence - not English grammar. Please can common 'incorrect' answers that DO demonstrate understanding be marked as correct.

5/29/2013, 12:13:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/potato_jam

I do agree that Duo should accept answers that may not be strictly grammatically correct but are commonly used anyway.

I posted about it because someone asked. It's a part of English that can trip people up, and in this case caused them to get an incorrect answer. Besides, as someone else said, there's no better way to learn English grammar than to learn another language!

5/29/2013, 2:14:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/alfiemoon12

Sorry potato_jam I was not directing that at you - just in frustration that in order for everyone to get this French question right we need your very detailed explanation of English grammar. You are absolutely correct - I have learnt a lot of English grammar as a result of learning French - which is great, and I am open to continue to learn - just prefer to be marked correct and be offered 'another correct solution' when actually using duolingo. Anyway, off my soap box now and will go back to practising rather than arguing!

5/29/2013, 2:33:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/potato_jam

Ah right, sorry to have misunderstood you

I guess that as we've just got to keep making suggestions so that the accepted answers will get closer to the English that people actually use. Some of the sentences that duolingo thinks are right are so funny

5/29/2013, 2:58:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/alfiemoon12

i wrote 'from who is the letter from'. perhaps whom is slightly grammatically better, but i feel i lost my heart on a technicality.;-)

3/18/2013, 8:47:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ParoleGramme
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'from who is the letter from' would be incorrect because you wrote "from" twice. "Whom" should technically always be used wherever "who" is not the subject (i.e. accusative and dative cases), but in all cases where you 'should' use "whom," "who" works just fine and duolingo shouldn't mark you wrong for it. "whom is this letter from" is incorrect, because "from" and "whom" are unseparable parts of the pronomial unit "from whom." The cases of "who" in English are: Nominative = "who"; genitive = "whose/from whom/of whom"; accusative = "whom"; dative = "to whom/with whom"

3/19/2013, 10:37:42 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Muzorewi1984

But, hang about, if "whom is this letter from" is incorrect because you can't separate the phrase "from whom" how come the correct answer duolingo gives is "who is this letter from" which clearly splits the phrase "from who". Or is there some obscure rule that says you can separate one but not the other?

3/19/2013, 10:38:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ParoleGramme
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"who is this letter from" is acceptable because that's how any American would say it. But if you're going to go to the trouble of using "from whom," you might as well stick to its most natural and common usage, as far as I can discover, which is unseparated (incidentally it sounds better too, in my opin.). maybe it's going too far to say your answer is outright incorrect, but you shouldn't be surprised that the computer doesn't recognize it either.

3/20/2013, 9:11:51 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mcgurker

Let's talk English. In English, the grammarian is the one who cares about "whom", and he or she is also the one who says "Don't end your sentences with prepositions!" Now, even the queen of England herself ends her sentences with prepositions, and this sentence right here does as well. So, if the grammarians are foolish and wrong about prepositions, why would you ever bother using "whom" when "who" works in every single case already?

3/27/2013, 5:39:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ankhwearer

I agree. I'm not sure I came to Quora to have my English grammar corrected. :-)

3/19/2013, 10:20:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DuFarge

The best way to learn YOUR language is to learn a foreign language. I never used 'to whom' 'for whom' until I took a year of college french over 30 years ago now (gasp). I learned more about English than I did in all of grammar/high school. Whether you came here to learn your English or not, isn't it nice to do so?

5/8/2013, 12:18:41 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/cjchem

It accepted "From whom is this letter." I guess Duo is picky about English word order also...

8/12/2013, 12:13:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/gregariosity

Actually the word "whom" is correct, but you should either say "from whom is the letter" or "who is this letter from." The first is more correct, but the second is more commonly used.

11/6/2013, 7:25:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Well... One simple way of deciding when to use Whom or Who is to apply Him to Whom and He to Who. From whom is this letter? From Him. Who sent this letter? He did. Why the From Whom is best not separated can be illustrated using "I Ran a mile" ....You wouldn't say "I a mile Ran". Neither would you say "Who this letter sent?". Same way with From Whom. This is a simple non-grammarian way of sorting this all, and it works. I note that Duo accepts splitting From and Whom and that is either an "Americanism" or just clumsy UK English.

11/12/2014, 2:32:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mnoonan912

The translation now has 'Whom is that letter from?', which is proper English. 'Whom' is appropriate when you are referring to the object in the sentence which, in this case, is the identity of the letter writer.

You use "who" when you are referring to the subject of a clause and "whom" when you are referring to the object of a clause.

2/13/2014, 12:07:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DuFarge

I've not had difficult with the voice until now. This one was horrible. Could not hear the 'r' in 'lettre' at all.

5/8/2013, 12:16:58 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/alfjmrodrigues

Isn't "Who's letter is this" also wright?

2/4/2014, 4:11:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/biocrite
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"Whose letter is this" should work.

2/15/2014, 1:40:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/TheRealNecator

So, I'm not a native english speaker, but albeit isn't it possible to say "By whom is this letter?"

5/9/2014, 11:51:54 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaxxel24

Yup - I got this wrong, but it's more natural to say "Who is this letter by" though of course we should be using Whom not Who. Perhaps it is still incorrect though, because "De qui" I think refers to the sender of the letter, which may not necessarily be the writer of the letter. I'll mark it to DL though.

3/7/2015, 5:51:31 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeRams25

had no idea what it was saying. funny enough, i know all of these words :(

5/18/2014, 3:35:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ulises225
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I don't understand why "cette" and not "ce", can somebody explain that to me please?

6/8/2014, 4:16:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dujie1968
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ce+masculine, cette+feminine

6/14/2014, 8:30:26 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AlQuzMar
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L in lettre sounds like v, doesn't it?

9/7/2014, 2:33:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/spitzbube12

incorrect English: whom???????????? you can say the letter is from whom? but not whom is the letter from it is Dativ

11/27/2014, 10:37:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Hiya, Spitzbubel12. One "Rule Of|Thumb" to decide whether to use Who or Whom is to apply He/She or Him/Her to the answer. So whichever way this task sentence is constructed, the answer is either He/She or Him/Her.So, Who wrote the letter? ...He did... Then, From Whom did I receive this letter?.... From Him. You are correct to object to the sentence ending in a preposition. This is precise grammar though. I know that our dear Sitesurf would certainly support your objection to the "Loose" usage here and so would I, if only I had the grasp on it that you two have. I don't. I suggest that if Duo uses loose grammar in translation to English then this is bad practise and surely must be fixed very soon. By the way, was it a typing mistake (I dislike that word: Typo)? I think it is Ditave. Check your keyboard settings, if I may suggest; your "?" key seems to be stuck. I mean well, but if we are to look into these things, let us be in our own right and in ourselves, correct?

11/27/2014, 11:28:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/waliche

I don't like the pronunciation of "lettre"on this one. Seems way off

12/16/2014, 5:03:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/CraigBotha

Surely you mean "From whom is that letter?"

2/4/2015, 5:40:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Mo-s_Na-f

I thaught the question is asking: about who this letter is? How would i say: what is this letter about?

4/3/2015, 8:51:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/roobee2sday
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AAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHH It's a problem with my native English not my French; it's not my fault I can't get the difference between who and whom.

4/19/2017, 9:46:45 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Yeah, Roobee, just like the apostrophe Who Vs Whom fills talk and debate over enough pints of beer to get academics legless! Here is a simple basic guide; Who is always used as the subject of a sentence or clause and Whom is always used as the direct object of a sentence or clause. (Shuttup Santa, there's an "E" on Clause here! Go back to sleep mate for 8 months.) Example: "Who is at the door?" Who is the subject and The Door is the object. "Whom did you see at the door?" Here Whom is the object and You is the subject. If this blinds you arreter la bierre, avoir du rhum! Votre ami JJ.

4/20/2017, 1:52:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Marty942382

Who is a subject. Whom is an object. "Who is this letter for?" is conversational and incorrect formally. The subject in that sentence is not who, it's the letter. So formally it's "For whom is this letter?" Or to make it easier it is "This letter is for whom?" Big hint: if it needs a preposition it's whom.

8/5/2018, 2:32:14 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Stevehunt13

The correct English would be "To whom" or "For whom"

9/12/2017, 5:19:08 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Thanks to folk such as you English survives Steve! However I allow Duo its little flaws because they come with no charge. I give you a lingot (blood diamond?) to highlight your important contribution. Thank you again. JJ.

9/12/2017, 6:22:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Stevehunt13

Ha! Thanks, JJ.

9/12/2017, 6:52:28 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cecilia203378

Whose letter is it?

5/30/2018, 7:42:24 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Marty942382

Once again the female speaker is very mushmouthed. It sounds as though the final word is "met" (english) rather than "lettre." If I hadn't seen the sentence before I would have missed it.

8/5/2018, 2:25:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Colin109657

I'm English and I can assure all and sundry that nobody would say "from whom is that letter" though perhaps not grammatically correct they would say who sent you that letter

10/31/2018, 10:08:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Kris-teen
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Why "Whose letter is that ?" is refused ?

12/23/2018, 11:11:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Murat941
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I think "cette lettre" is being mispronounced .

1/19/2019, 4:32:57 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dreamerowls
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"De qui est cette lettre?" est la même chose que dire "A qui est cette lettre?"

Merci beaucoup!

6/2/2015, 11:21:05 AM
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