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  5. "הקוף רוצֶה מסטיק."

"הקוף רוצֶה מסטיק."

Translation:The monkey wants gum.

August 9, 2016

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/legom7

Nice earthbound reference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoseDark94

ha'kof rotzeh mastik


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheOneAndOnlyBK

I am surprised we haven't seen any banana/monkey action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alex_abraham
<pre>Like if you also wrote, 'The teaspoon wants a chewing gum' </pre>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Why not "a" gum ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elias103541

I realize this question is old, but in case someone wonders the same thing, I'll still answer it. In English, "gum" is an uncountable noun. If you wanted to specify a quantity, you'd have to establish the unit first, so to speak. You could say a piece of gum or two rooms stuffed full of gum etc. On its own, gum doesn't require an indefinite article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xnaut

Mah stick of gum


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dahyana873627

why it doesn't take bubblegum as a correct option?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henryka_S.

Is the same word used in Hebrew for a monkey and an ape?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, Hebrew usually does not make this distintion, but you may say קוֹפֵי־אָדָם (German Menschenaffen) for (anthropoid) apes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angel586321

While reading a book!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ichteltelch

Is that word related to "mastication"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, yes indeed, both are derived from the same Greek root: the verb μαστιχάω [mastikh'ao:] to gnash the teeth and the noun μαστίχη [mast'ikhe:] mastic gum, used in medicine or for chewing.

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