"Ты послезавтра свободен?"

Translation:Are you free the day after tomorrow?

August 9, 2016

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/nahuatl1939

is is really necessary - in english - to say" the day " after tomorrow ? isn't "after tomorrow" sufficient ? i mean, " after tomorrow" cannot mean anything else but ( the day after.... ) but is it really`necessary to say it ? the French say "apres-demain" German says " uebermorgen" Spanish says "pasado manana" - Italian " doppo domani" aso

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1432

The day after tomorrow - two days from now.
After tomorrow - two or any larger number of days from now. Certainly, a particular context may take care of this ambiguity, but I would not equate these two expressions.
By the way, in this particular case, I would actually expect the meanings to be different. To me, "I am free after tomorrow" means that the speaker has a very busy day tomorrow, but any other day after that is fine.

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/taffarelbergamin

Learning English in a Russian course... I would never guess "послезавтра" would need that many words in English... I thought Portuguese was the one weird language that didnt have a name for the day that comes directly after tomorrow... But at least we dont have to say the day because it is obvious.

May 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3

How would you distinguish "the day after tomorrow" from the (to the majority of posters here, at least) much broader concept of "after tomorrow" out of curiosity? This sentence seems like the ideal case when two separate expressions are needed to avoid ambiguity.

July 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/zirkul
Mod
  • 1432

FYI: Russian "послезавтра" is после+завтра (after tomorrow) merged together. So you would have to ask the same question about Russian: when you just hear the word (so you don't see whether it's one or two words), how do you know what is actually meant? Yet I can't recall a single instance of such a confusion. Personally, I would say "после завтрашнего дня" for "after tomorrow" just to avoid such a confusion, but guess the context often takes care of that as well.

July 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3

Echoing taffarelbergamin's point, at least Russian Wiktionary seems to mark the stress on the "о" in послезавтра as secondary. I assume that to the ear послезавтра is normally effectively distinct from после завтра, much like "greenhouse" is aurally distinct, because of stress, from "green house" and "bluebird" from "blue bird"?

July 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/taffarelbergamin

yes, I've noticed that... Maybe the stress could help us understanding when spoken? Just a guess. I'm not sure.

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/taffarelbergamin

In Portuguese, the default meaning for "after tomorrow" is the day that comes just after tomorrow because that is usually the meaning you want to express. For saying like "any day after tomorrow" you could say just that, or "any day, except tomorrow" or "any day from the 12th [day of this month, which is the day after tomorrow (bear in mind, we don't say dates in this way. I'm trying to make it closer to English)]".

Usually when you need to express this meaning, the context will help you interpreting it and it rarely becomes ambiguous in a real conversation.

Edit:

One more case in conversation would be: "No, I can't tomorrow. Only after it". This would express any day after tomorrow, but "No, I can't tomorrow. Only after tomorrow" would imply the day after tomorrow, unless the speaker adds more information.

BTW, we don't really have the word "it" (only he or she, but even then, would not be used in this example). I guess what we would say is more in the lines of "Only after this", but used "it" as it sounds more natural in English.

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Oinophilos

Note: the Duo translation insists on "the" here, but native speakers commonly omit it.

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3

I can imagine hearing somebody say it without the 'the', but it strikes me as a lamentable business speak employing silly methods to give some impression of increased efficiency [I'm too busy and productive for definite articles!]. But I doubt you could get a usage panel to concur that this has entered the standard register.

August 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ari675341

As a native speaker, I've never heard the "the" being ommitted! Out of curiosity, which country/region are your native speakers from? :)

August 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bakedak

I was born and raised outside of Philadelphia, learning English as my first language from parents who were native speakers (who were also raised by native speakers . . . etc). Leaving out the "the" is common there - or at least, not uncommon. "Day after tomorrow" is used almost like a hyphenated word, or a set construction.

October 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/chris_rennick

I agree with the comments below. It is not necessary to say 'the'

March 20, 2018
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