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"Можно мне кофе с молоком и печенье?"

Translation:Can I have coffee with milk and cookies?

August 10, 2016

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edyapd

Can I say: "May I have a coffee with milk and cookies?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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  • 2328

Certainly. Just be aware that "a coffee"="a cup of coffee".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/edyapd

Спасибо. Но пока не принимают


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil_Stracchino

But that gets marked wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex_2607

Why "Could I have coffee with milk and cookies?" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Because it hasn't been reported enough yet. Do so should the occasion arise again :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkReinski

No it seems right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keeks881

"Could" should be accepted here. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chirelchirel

Why both a cookie and cookies are correct here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

печенье is a mass noun in Russian. "Milk and cookies" also has some characteristics of a fixed expression in English. I would sort of envision it as a request to bring the cookie tray over, irrespective of how many cookies (1 or more than 1) the requester actually desired. I don't know if the Russian has precisely the same connotation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chirelchirel

Thanks :) Now I started to wonder if the original sentence means coffee+milk and cookies or coffee with milk+cookies :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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  • 2328

All three mixed together in one cup/bowl ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chirelchirel

Would that count as каша?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Absolutely, since one of the definitions of каша is "slurry, mush", and another is "mess, chaos".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Wait, that wouldn't have to be печеньем?!?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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You are right. But the moment I see anybody asking to add milk to a perfectly good coffee (or tea, for that matter), I stop comprehending the rest ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Same thing for me with "milk and cookies" apparently!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

You're right, of course :) печенье is perfectly declinable. I'm not a coffee drinker, myself, but I think I personally would very likely produce this sentence as "a café au lait and some cookies," particularly as I see this sentence as by far the most plausible in the context of placing an order at a coffee shop. Of course then I would actually have to specify how many cookies...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chirelchirel

Yeah, that was how I first understood it, but then the "milk and cookies" thing confused me :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithBrown932

In my exceedingly humble opinion, to be real old-school British about it, the correct question should be "May I have......" , not "Can.....".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leslie509391

Does Russian have the same distinction? I don't think so. Therefore, this sentence could mean either "May I have...." or "Can I have....?" depending on the context.

Perhaps the person hasn't had time to read the menu, or is unsure of the availability of the items, and is asking if it possible to get coffee and cookies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikRempe

Why isn't cookies in instrumental here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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It's accusative because it's a direct object here: one is "кофе с молоком" and the other one is "печенье". In other words, it's "кофе и печенье" while "c молоком" simply modifies "кофе".
You can also use instrumental here, but then you will be combining "молоко + печенье" instead of "кофе + печенье".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

I think by "use instrumental here" you mean switching the и and the с so it would be "кофе и молоко с печеньем"? Otherwise wouldn't you just generate the "all three mixed together" case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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No, that's not what I meant. Let me try this:
кофе с молоком и печенье = (coffee with milk) + cookies
кофе с молоком и печеньем = coffee with (milk + cookies)
The parenthesis indicate which "operation" is done first.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Ah, ok. So combining the "молоко + печенье" first but then still combining them both with the кофе and yielding, well, some interesting substance ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikRempe

Thx guys it's clearer, but кофе с молоком и печеньем wouldn't necessarily mean that you actually mix them into a weird substance, right? I mean, even if you use instrumental or accusative, the meaning would be exactly the same?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zirkul
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@ErikRempe

No, in practice it would not mean preparing that weird mix, of course, -- unless you insist on the most literal interpretation. Your sentence will be understood in exactly the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

Is it accusative or nominative? Do we assume that "Можно мне кофе?" means mentally inserting "to have" (or it's equivalent): "May I have coffee" or "Is it possible for me to have coffee?"

Or is it more literal in the Russian: "Coffee for me is possible?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaudialk

The Oxford comma would really help here!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

In American English, "coffee with milk and cookies" is ambiguous and confusing; "milk and cookies" is a idiom meaning "a glass of milk and a cookie/some cookies". I read the Russian as meaning "coffee with milk, and a cookie/some cookies".

As stated by zirkul:
"кофе с молоком и печенье = (coffee with milk) + cookies
кофе с молоком и печеньем = coffee with (milk + cookies)
The parenthesis indicate which "operation" is done first."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Klaudialk

This sentence really should be translated as "can I have A coffee with milk and biscuits?" because "Can I have coffee with milk and biscuits?" sounds like the milk and biscuits come together, which makes considerable less sense as a useful sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamelaDeem

When I used "can" in one exercise, it was called wrong and the answer was "Is it possible to..." Here I used "Is it possible to have coffee..." and it was called wrong. GRRRRRRR!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheFinkie

Surely there is a better word to use than "have"! It is not very eloquent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piguy3

Apparently "old-school" British speakers beg to differ: https://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/2009/05/can-i-get-redux.html

As an American, it's the "can," not the "have" that seems a bit unusual to me. "Could" would be more polite and my go-to.

What would you propose out of curiosity?

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