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  5. "הרופאה קוראת לנכד שלו."

"הרופאה קוראת לנכד שלו."

Translation:The doctor calls his grandson.

August 10, 2016

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariel.biel

"His" must be referring to someone else's grandson, because the sentence is referring to a female doctor, so it wouldn't make sense otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xerostomus

Yes it is a very goog exercise for exact understanding. I am able to see it already, so God bless Duolingo! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Buddy539836

תודה I already was thinking: what....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ultorex

So maybe the female doctor calls the grandson of the male patient to pick up the latter at the practice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John758270

... or ... a man is waiting at the doctor's reception room with his grandson and she (the doctor) calls his (the man's) grandson to the office for a check-up/medical observation when his (grandson's) turn comes up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahBerry17

What is the difference between calling and reading to someone? Just context?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BasCostBudde

my guess is that to read to someone would be להקריא, not לקרוא Native please confirm :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessikaMorgan

Different prepositions. In english you would read "with" someone and call "to" someone. Check out the verb on pealim.com and it should list the prepositions there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

That's not accurate. In English you read TO somebody. (At least if you're reading aloud and that person is listening.) Also, while it's sometimes possible to call TO somebody (e.g. yelling "Joey, come home. It's time for dinner" across a playground), 99% of the time you simply call somebody. English verbs take direct objects, rather than prepositions, a lot more than Hebrew verbs.

Or were you saying that in HEBREW you use "to" with call and "with" with read? It wasn't clear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChayaDoppelt

That's how they'te used in Hebrew


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stanehr

surely it should be "the doctor calls her grandson"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jg9000

She could be calling someone else's grandson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IreneLitGi

Yes but why to make it so confusing when we learn the word grandson


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Could " is calling for.." work as well ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Yes, Hebrew doesn't have as many tenses as English. http://www.free-hebrew.com/tag/hebrew-tenses/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanFendel

I listened to this several times to sort out the genders, and finally decided I was mishearing the final word. Bad sentence!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

I disagree, it requires careful listening which is an important skill


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/metasj

The mobile sentence offers "fem." as a way to clarify the gender of the doctor, but didn't recognize that as a correct answer...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

How would you say, "The doctor reads to his grandson?" At first I thought that was what this said


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, I suppose you would read this sentence as "calls his granddaughter", unless you give a stronger hint like הָרוֹפְאָה קוֹרֵאת לַנֶּכְדָּה שֶׁלָּה סִפּוּרִים / סֵ֫פֶר the doctor reads to her granddaughter stories / a book. If you want to make it clearer, you could use the hiph'il הִקְרִיא to read aloud: הִיא מַקְרִאָה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AaronPhili10

What's the difference in Hebrew writing between "the doctor calls his grandson" and "the doctor is reading to his grandson"? Both use לקרוא as the verb... maybe the reading option would be "הרופה קורא לנכדו"? Can someone confirm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Well, להקריא is used for "reading to somebody". It's the same root, but different binyan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jonatasrt

HaRof'eh not Rof'ah, if the grandson is his own grandson. But here it seems that the female doctor calls a grandson of someone else (who is waiting for an appointment)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nikol273207

grandchild is incorrect here.. could it be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

No, ‏נכד (nekhed) is grandson. This is singular, so unlike for example the plural masculine of ‏ילדים which can include children of both genders, נכד is always grandson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

In order to understand the sentence, you need not only to read it carefully, but also think carefully of a situation in which the given sentence is correct, rather than assuming it’s in error.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yukomunakata

שלה? לא שלו


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellen553689

שלה לא שלו


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FerruccioO2

shouldn't it be: שלה?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarlHansFu1

If the doctor is female it should be her and not his


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, in the scenario of the sentence, the שֶׁלוֹ does not need to be reflexive to the subject. Imagine the grandfather sits in the waiting room with his ill grandchild and the doctor calls the boy in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deena277337

Please change this already.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0LZK8

"her", not "his"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, it is not her own grandchild. In this setting she calls the boy of another grandfather. Sometimes doctors call in patients i suppose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rochelle43

The doctor (female) calls HER grandson surely


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

The (female) doctor calls her (male) patient's granson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rochelle43

It is not made at all clear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Well, when translating into Hebrew, they also accept הרופא, and when you translate into Englis, there isn't any different wprd for male or female doctor, so there shouldn't be any confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rochelle43

I just used the words provided rather than the keyboard so I wouldn't know if it would have been accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda851392

The possesive does not match the gender of the doctor and the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

This has already been addressed multiple times in the comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

But they never read the comments. Nor the replies to their comments. Sigh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shana74365

?למה הרופאה קוראת ...שלו


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marita638289

HaRofa (doctor) is here female. Normally we have to say at the end shela: הרופאה קוראת לנכד שלה.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

You have to read the comments above to understand this tricky sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SophiaTrou1

Doctor is female so it should be shela.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChayaDoppelt

Unless she's calling her neighbor's grandson

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