1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Hebrew
  4. >
  5. "מה נפח האמבטיה הזאת?"

"מה נפח האמבטיה הזאת?"

Translation:What is the volume of this bath?

August 11, 2016

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

Could it be "bathroom"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

That would be חֲדַר־אַמְבַּטְיָה, literally "bath-room" too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

תודה רבה לך!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AraREL

I wrote Capacity. It should be allowed instead of volume too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

I agree with you that "capacity" should be accepted when discussing the amount of material that a container can hold, i.e., inner dimensions. My understanding was always that "volume" considered the thickness of the walls of a container, i.e., how much space that container takes up (which is something you need to know if you are figuring out how many containers you can fit into, let's say, a truck or storage unit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

I'll go back to the flag and ask DL to accept capacity. Of course, in practical terms, people do use the word volume for the inner dimensions, as in the earlier exercise, "What is the volume of the bottle?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zdeka985336

If it is the volume why it is not הנפח?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

The sentence uses a construct form ("this bath-volume"), therefore only אַמְבַּטְיָה has the article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiraBatya1

I just wanted to point out to English learners that in normative English we say "i'm taking a bath" but "I'm in the bathtub" , like going for a swim in a swimming pool. Their translation sounds odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

What are you talking about? This sentence has nothing to do with taking a bath...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MeiraBatya1

I'm talking about the fact that the English sentence should be "what is the volume of the bathtub", not " what is the volume of the bath"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Both "bath" and "bathtub" refer to the place where you take/have a bath. "Bath" can also mean the act of bathing. Maybe you specifically don't say it that way, but the English in this sentence is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabel544786

Audio: Here the stressed syllable is on am in ambatia. Just listening the sentence is like this to me: ma nefakhAMbatiazot. Maybe there is something about moving of the stressed syllable when spoken fast, or is the stress on the first syllable of ambatia always?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, the usual stress of אַמְבַּטְיָה seems to lie on its penultimate: [am'batja].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Celioluzverde

Does it mean that the penultimate syllable is Ti ? amba Ti a zot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, אַמְבַּטְיָה has three syllables: the antepenultimate [am], the stressed penultimate [bat] and the ultimate [ya].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XeroStomus1

ante - before

paene - almost

ultimus - last

all from latin


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

The game does not end there: propreantepenultimate is the last but four.

Learn Hebrew in just 5 minutes a day. For free.