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  5. "Es domingo; él no pudo haber…

"Es domingo; él no pudo haber ido a la escuela."

Translation:It is Sunday; he could not have gone to school.

February 6, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JudithStacey

what's wrong with "he cannot have gone"? doesn't it have the same meaning in English as "he could not have gone"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/k-kayak

Pudo is past tense, so you need could, not can. "Cannot have gone" just doesn't sound right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adriano732737

"Pudo" is indicative preterite, ("...he was not able to have gone..." ... cannot have gone. For "could not have gone" should not the conjugation have been the conditional "podria"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelley850782

I get the sentence and its translation. Could someone please explain the purpose of the word "haber" in this particular sentence? I'm a little lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil891051

Haber represents 'have' in the sentence. If you weren't talking about what you could have done the haber would be in the él form (ie ha ido, he has gone). Instead you could have done it so take the infinitive Haber.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelley850782

Thanks! Have a lingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil891051

That's the first time this has happened. How moving!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelley850782

That makes this a special occasion! To celebrate, have another!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CakeTimePapa

I guess cannot doesn't work either. It says it has to be could not. Difference is tense i guess right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minagpt

exaclty, must be "could" because it's past !! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ultara

It should be correct; that's a perfectly fine idiomatic translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CattleRustler

exactamente, pudo is past tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phototimmermans

"could not have gone" = "was not able to have gone", but DL says this is wrong. I think it should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alice744069

You could argue that's a literal translationI guess but it's utterly ungrammatical in English. Thus it is not a useful translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

The sentence and suggested translation seem grammatically correct, it’s just a confusing sentence, and something I would,likely never say in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elizadeux

I would absolutely say something like this. Suppose someone said, "Where could he be? Could he have gone to school?" My reply would be" No, it's Sunday. He couldn't have gone to school. Why would he go to school? The school is closed."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adriano732737

He could have gone to Sunday School!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisDavie19

Anyone know why this could not be "its sunday, he couldnt have been to school"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Filis11358

CrisDavie19, it is probably because of the word 'ido'. They expect you to use the word 'gone'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1beppe

my exercise was "type what you hear"; what I don't understand is why "no pudo 'haber' ido...." ? y non "no pudo ir a ....." ?? ( not native speaker in both languages ) The question is about the Spanish verb, not the English translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marja300029

él no podría haber ido a la escuela. Was accepted

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