https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7

Norwegian ease

swingbeatnik7
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I've got to say, I have never progressed so quickly on DL than in the Norwegian for English speakers course. The grammar rules are pretty simple. I've progressed in days where it would take me weeks for other languages.

Did anyone else have this experience of progression? Or perhaps, on the other hand, face challenges? Norwegian is so beautiful and the fact that I can grasp it easily as a native English speaker makes it even better.

2 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/amaratea
amaratea
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If you are fluent in English, Norwegian will be pretty easy. And the rest is provided by the Norwegian team - they did an excellent job to make material both useful and entertaining.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak
LeviPolasak
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Wait until you get farther in, happened to me in Dutch. The prepositions, the split verbs, and such ALWAYS kill me. (Dutch ones I mean)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchellBe658308

If you learn German first, Dutch is easy. :-D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolyglotCiro
PolyglotCiro
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hahaha XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991
Luke_5.1991
Mod
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So glad to hear it! I had a similar experience when I started learning Norwegian myself. In some ways, it's even easier than Esperanto.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7
swingbeatnik7
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Yes! I'm sure it'll get more difficult, but I've found that the rules (including the irregular ones) are easy to remember. I agree, so far it seems easier than Esperanto... perhaps because I am not a native Romance language speaker.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee1145
Dee1145
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I'm a native English speaker. Learning Norwegian has been pretty simple, worry-free. I enjoy it very much! The three major challenges I'm facing now are mastering adverbs, building vocabulary and advancing my conversational skills. Duolingo has been really helpful through it all!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yoitsuian

Do you really have a 588 day streak? :o whoa!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee1145
Dee1145
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I love practicing norsk. It's my favorite language!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I keep getting distracted by other languages, but as far as I've got, Norwegian does seem pretty user-friendly. Which is probably just as well considering how many dialects there are. If the language itself was super hard, it'd be easy to get seriously discouraged by the idea of dialects on top.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ericthelinguist

Exact opposite of me. Learning scandinavian languages is somehow the hardest thing in the world. I don't know why I find it so hard. It's completely demoralizing when I think of how easily French/Spanish came to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7
swingbeatnik7
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I understand, I have some difficult with all the rules surrounding Romance languages. The conjugation of verbs and the tenses. Be happy that they came to you easily though! Are you a native English speaker?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brittalexiswm

I had that with Swedish! The scandinavian languages are fairly easy if you speak English!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neio75
neio75
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I see that you're also learning Esperanto, is Norwegian even easier than Esperanto?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingbeatnik7
swingbeatnik7
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Yes as a native English speaker it is easier to grasp. Esperanto, while easy, is much easier for those who grew up speaking Romance languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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I think that's an "it depends" question. I've found Norwegian fairly user friendly, but by no means easier than Esperanto, which is extremely easy to get a handle on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bergenhopps
bergenhopps
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Yeah, progression has been very easy. Almost too easy, actually. I occasionally go back to German lessons to give myself more of a challenge.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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Norwegian and English are structurally very similar languages. The struggles usually concern pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saa_Fred
Saa_Fred
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While we're on the topic, I'm having trouble distinguishing words like følger and føler. Is the difference just from context, or would a native speaker hear a difference?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sindrebr
Sindrebr
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'Følger' is pronounced with a short first syllable (as if it were written 'føller', while 'føler' has a long first syllable. It is similar to the difference between English 'filler' and 'feeler'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/madiscato

this is a huge problem for me. I can read and write it but have trouble pronouncing it! it would be more helpful to actually speak. I love duo lingo but need to speak the language to learn the pronunciation. any ideas?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchellBe658308

(Hoping I didn't already post this by accident)

I find that it helps I speak German pretty fluently. I minored in it in college and am still fairly adept. It's helped me figure out some of the things that are not pretty normal for a native English speaker.

I also find it that a challenge. For example: if you tack an ". -en" onto the end of a German noun, you make it plural. Obviously in Norwegian, it's kinda the opposite - it makes it a definite noun.

And i can see the fact that "Hun" and "Hund" are so close to the same sound causing problems in the spoken language, if you catch my drift.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neorxnawang

"Hun" is originally the Danish form of the word, which is only used in and around Oslo, where the dialects are largely replaced by bokmål. The native forms are "ho", "hu", and in Bergen only, "hon". But most people in Eastern Oslo still say "hu" in everyday conversation. I am born in Bærum, to the west of Oslo, which is known for very snobbish language, and have never said anything but "hu". But young people say "hun".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danielroot1

I think English is fundamentally a Scandinavian language; that had a ton of French grafted onto it by William the Conquerer. It flows in the brain of a native English speaker a lot more smoothly than German or the Romantic languages do. At least it does for me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MitchellBe658308

(English major with a ton of Linguistics classwork commenting here):

English and Scandinavian share a lot of Teutonic roots. It's not so much that English is "Scandinavian" as English shares North Teutonic roots with Scandinavian languages.

I speak German fairly fluently (never mind my "Level 2" on Duolingo) and sound Dutch incredibly easy to speak when I was over there, with no formal training whatsoever. Frisian - spoken on the Frisian islands off the German, Dutch and Danish coasts - is even closer to English, and easier still.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margreet51983

NO. It is hard to learn any language for me, slow slow work. I am more a beta student...I am just at level 19 after a year of dayly practise... I am Dutch, and pretty good in English, i can understand German and had some French, Greek and Hebrew in school 25- 30 years ago. Norwegian is a Germanic language so it is close and many words are the same or have the meaning close to the Dutch, but this is also confusing.. Understanding the general topic i can, but the real details or translating from Dutch to Norwegian is so hard. Also learning Norwegian from English does not make it easier. I wish there was a Dutch course, that would help! But i will keep calm and carry on. The things we do for love ;-)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whukriede
whukriede
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I find the language very hard, especially the listening exercises.

2 years ago

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