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  5. "כן, זה רגיל."

"כן, זה רגיל."

Translation:Yes, that is normal.

August 12, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chinchilla21

shouldn't usual be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

That's a valid translation in my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsazbon

shouldn't common be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Common is נפוץ. I don't think they are interchangeable in English either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahBerry17

Can you also translate רגיל as regular? Although I probably wouldn't say, "this is regular. " (I would say, "this is usual," or "this is normal.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Depends how you use regular...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xos...

?ר.ג.ל How exactly does it relate to the root


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

That's one of the meanings the root ר-ג-ל has. For example, להתרגל (in binyan Hitpa'el) means 'to get accustomed to-'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom273734

Is it related to the English "regular" or Latin "regulus"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Hebrew רָגִיל is derived from the noun רֶ֫גֶל foot, from which the root רגל to go by foot and then to go about frequently was created.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom273734

OK, thanks. Then, is there any possibility that Latin got it from Hebrew or some other Semitic language?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, no regō (to rule, govern) is a very established indogermanic root, meaning originally something like to straighten.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

It's not related to English, since it already appears in the Mishnah. My guess that it's not related to Latin either, just an extension of the known Semitic root ר-ג-ל.

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