1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. "J'ai mis ça."

"J'ai mis ça."

Translation:I have put that on.

February 6, 2014

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RGL14

I translated it as, "I put that" and got it correct. Seems very different from the other correct answer, "I have put that ON". Are both really correct - they seem like different meanings - or should Duo have marked me wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

"I put that" doesn't seem like English to me. So I tried the other one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoubleLingot

"I put that" is not an accepted answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tondzino

Why not "I put this on"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Strictly speaking, "this" would be "ceci." ça is that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

Is I have placed it not accepted because this is an idiom. Put on is an acceptable translation of mettre but it is not the only one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Placed is usually poser.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JobeyinError

I am wondering if there is something wrong with 'I placed that' too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"I placed that" is accepted. 07Jul15


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AvromMalks

Strange. It's not accepted as of 24Sept17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

"I put that" was marked wrong. Where does the "on" come from? " I put that" is perfectly good English - as in "I put that" for the answer, and was marked wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

By the way, reviewing the other comments, many people say that "I put that" WAS accepted!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

It's part of the French definition of mettre - to put on an item of clothing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

But does it always have to be "put on". I thought mettre could also be "to put". If I wanted to say "I put that" would it perhaps be "j'ai fait ca"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

Just checked, and "mettre" can be just "put" as in "Ou est-ce que tu as mis les clés" (with appropriate accents of course!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

I don't think the issue is with mettre meaning put, I think it's this specific sentence. "I put that" is, to my ear, a slightly odd sentence and I'm not 100% sure it's standard English. Even if so, that doesn't mean that there wouldn't be a different way of saying it in French. There are other verbs, such as poser or placer, probably others I don't know. If its about putting an answer on a test or questionnaire, maybe they have another way of saying it.

So describe when you would say "I put that" and maybe we can ask a French speaker what is the equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathyKimball

I said "I set it down." that was called wrong but "I put it down." was a correct option. I don't get the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

To set something down often means more than just putting something down in English. To set something down carries more intention as to the manner of putting it down or the location that it was placed in. That is why you can use ...set the table.... but not ...put the table. You can put items on the table carefully but setting items on the table implies more purposeful activity. So purposeful that often the arrangement may conform to a shared expectation of what the result should be.

Dictionaries give ...to put as being mettre. They give ....to set as being mettre en place.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doctorplatano

While such differences exist, there are clear and commonplace cases where "to set" and "to put" are synonymous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

But there are occasions where they are not which is why, in both English and French, there are different words.

In this example, Duo wants to find out if students know the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jbeback

I agree. They are often synonymous. In fact, when I hovered over the word "mis," both "put" and "set" were given as translations. I think it's a mistake and I will report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdrc22

I said I put that down and it was incorrect. ???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1895

"Poser" would be used for putting something down. "Mettre" may often be used (in the context of clothing and sometimes other things) as "to put it on". So it is no stretch to say "J'ai mis ça" = I put it on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bananenschalen

Is this just a quirk of French or should this properly be "J'ai mis ça sur." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"J'ai mis ça sur" is incorrect. One of the common meanings of "mettre" is "to put on" (as clothing), and the "on" is therefore included in the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frnch1Lrnr

I wrote "I have put it" and was marked correct!! Why?? It seems this should have been incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/northernguy

The problem here is the way tenses map across different languages.

English speakers routinely apply the simple past when other available tenses could be used and maybe even when they would be a better usage than the simple past. Still, English speakers will use a less precise tense because English speakers in conversation shift a considerable amount of burden of understanding on to the listener. The simple past is good enough because often the difference doesn't matter to the speaker and if the listener is concerned, he can simply ask for clarification.

Other languages, and especially French, prefer to use the more exact tenses that are available because of their greater precision. Their speakers take on more of the burden making the meaning clear.

So your answer is correct because: it accurately translates the French; it is grammatically correct English; with some effort can be understood by English speakers.

Of course, from an English speakers point of view it is wrong because: English speakers just don't talk that way; using it in conversation would definitely break up the flow of the sentence and challenge most listener's initial comprehension.

Duo could insist that you translate it precisely to show you understand the French. They could insist that you make it English friendly to show you know how to put it properly in English. They could accept either answer. Or they could alternate between all three, sometimes insisting on one or the other and at other times occasionally accepting both. Duo seems to take the latter approach, sometimes accepting both, sometimes insisting on one specific approach.

This could be the result of different programmers designing individual questions. Or maybe they just want to say.....made you look.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frnch1Lrnr

Thanks for your thoughtful and comprehensive response, northernguy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Isn't "put" a transitive verb in English? It seems incorrect to me to use it as an intransitive verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1895

You're right. It needs something more to be natural English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KovacsGy

I don't really see why "I put that" is good, but "I did put that" is not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I don't understand why either is considered correct. I can't come up with any situation where I would say "I put that" or "I did put that" without something else to complete the thought - "I put that down," "I put that on," "I put that under the table," "I put that in Mary's room," etc., etc., etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

I agree - put seems like a transitive verb only.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/comqrgo

Dunno about in Français but in English the distinction between these two statements seems clear to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KovacsGy

I'm not arguing that the two sentences are not different, however that doesn't mean they couldn't be translated to the same French sentence. What I really wonder about is in what way the French translation of "I did put that" would be different from the French sentence we got; for example: would we use a different tense than passé composé?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serj648517

Duo answered "I laid this" (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1895

Wrong. Removed!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdrc22

Can someone please explain why "I put that down" is incorrect???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nzchicago

Mettre is not used in that sense. For putting an object down, I believe you would use poser. But mettre can be used to refer to wearing clothes, so"put on" is accepted although there is no "on" in the French expression.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 1895

"Poser" = to put (something) down. "Mettre" = to put (something) on (i.e., clothing).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueWaller

As for my reply to nzchicago, mettre can also be used for "to put" only. See Reverso Dictionnaire.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTCarey

Why is "I put that" correct but not "I have put that". I can see why I have put that on is right and is a better translation, but why is I put that, more right than I have put that, which for me are both incomplete phrases in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dermatology

"I put that" is very common in English....the object is implicit or refers back to another speaker's comment. Commonest use I can think of is when referring to an answer in, for example, an exam. Anyway, it wasn't accepted for me even if it was for RGL14?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosemarySp

I put on that...why not!

Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.