1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: French
  4. >
  5. "Elle ne voulait pas changer …

"Elle ne voulait pas changer d'opinion."

Translation:She did not want to change her opinion.

February 3, 2013

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nicochio

where does "her" come from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shimself

It's certainly implied in the original, I can't think it means anything other than her own opinion

in English you don't normally say want to change opinion

one says want to change her opinion

Not that DL is great at colloquial English, but it's good here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/la.coccinelle

I think it's like with the other example. In French it's 'Je vais changer de chemise' instead of 'Je vais changer ma chemise.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shimself

the last word sounds like de pigner i just cannot hear the ion at the end


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dindrtahl

Is this a fixed phrase or something? "changer d'opinion"? The alternative "changer son opinion" is correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evelim1972

"She didn't want to change the opinion" is wrong, what does "de" of "d'opinion" mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minosca

I'm not a English native speaker but I don't think "To change the opinion" is correct. I would better say "To change someone's mind". Sometimes you can't translate litterally from a language to another... Ex. the literal translation of "I like you" is "Je te plais" but the correct one is "Tu me plais"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shimself

The literal translation of "I like you" is "Je t'aime" (deep breath, husky groan, oh Serge oh Jane) "Je te plais" is "I please you" isn't it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minosca

Je t'aime means I love you. But I was trying to explain that word by word translation is not always correct. In English the subject is "I" while in French translation the subject is TU. I like him = Il me plait (not JE lui plais because it means He likes me).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

Is that not because plaire is a transative verb meaning to be liked by, so il me plait means he is liked by me, rather like il me manque, he is missing to me, or I miss him in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/setijoso

what's wrong with just "she did not want to change opinion"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSA_GW
  • 1269

Why "she would not want change her opinion" is not accepted please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

So if the personal pronoun is understood, how would you say, of say , a politician, 'she did not want to change opinion', ( of others) or indeed 'she did not want to change their opinion?'

Learn French in just 5 minutes a day. For free.