"Én nem látok lángost."

Translation:I do not see lángos.

August 15, 2016

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PShovak

What is lángos?

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%A1ngos

A kind of fried flatbread, often topped with cheese and/or sour cream (tejföl).

An image search may say more than a thousand words :)

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PShovak

Thanks!

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Hetawastaken

I love lángos! If I'm not served quickly enough the next time I get the chance to order one, I'll just say "Én nem látok lángost!". :D (Just kidding.)

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/JimmRepp

How about simply "I do not see langos."?

August 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterKaton

Hahaha, "I do not see lángos", so, why give a solution: fried dough, while dosen't use? :)

November 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Martybet

I wish it wouldn't say "almost correct' when you type "langos" for the English translation on an English keyboard.

September 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikAnderson3

Indeed. English doesn't use diacritics, and when terms are borrowed from other languages, the diacritics generally disappear. If they insist on "langos" in the English ("frybread" is much more natural and generally understandable, but the Duolingo setup currently doesn't accept this), they should accept "langos" without the diacritics.

September 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/oh1231

Frybread doesnt really work, because many other countries have frybread which basically removes the point of putting a hungarian meal in the lessons

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/EdwardCS

Is this really a priority vocabulary word for people to be learning? I'm finding it difficult enough to remember vocabulary I might actually use ;)

November 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Lángos is a very important word and concept. :)

December 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/adakatelyn

If you are in hungary you are likely to encounter lángos. This is a significantly more useful sentence compared with the battling teachers or the dizzy apples.

June 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/HirundoPrima

The German course is frequently haunted by the Oktoberfest, and the Russian course is full of shchi (щи) and borshch (борщ). Learning a language also requires learning the basic cultural phenomenons as well, first and foremost food.

October 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/chiasthmatic

Why not "I am not looking at langos"?

January 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Lát is the more passive "to see".
Actively looking at something is described with the verb néz.

January 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/chiasthmatic

thanks!

January 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/wavelength

In Hindi and Arabic, Nazar, or Nezar means sight. Same roots probably

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

The Arabic etymology is a bit hard to find, but néz definitely has Finno-Ugric roots in the PFU rootword "*näke-".

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Yakuul

And in Arabic, it isn't originally a /z/ in the middle. It's a pharyngealized voiced dental-avleolar fricative (close to a pharyngealized version of /ð/ - an edh, like in 'bathe', but not 'bath', which is a simple theta), most languages don't have the ð or θ, so they change it to something else when they borrow words from languages like Arabic, to z (and s) for example, but not always those.

April 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexPhisique

"I don't see any langos". Where is hungarian Bármilyen that means Any? Your answer is incorrect.

November 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

The "best translation" is given as "I do not see lángos." In English it's also much more natural to use an article or quantifier going with these kinds of sentences. Here that would be "any". It doesn't change the meaning.

November 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Krysiulek

Yes, you've got to have the "any", or you could say "I don't see the langos" (that you are referring to), or "I don't see a langos" (but you see other things). Langos is like an "elephant ear" -- a large piece of fried dough, round and flat, that in America at least is usually served sweet.

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

If you talk about the lángos that you're referring to, you need to use definite grammar: "Nem látom a lángost."

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Krysiulek

Super! But your translation ""I do not see lángos" is not possible in English. How can we fix it? In English, it could be only: in the singular, it the possibilities are: "I don't see a/the/any langos". Thank you!

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikAnderson3

@Krysiulek:

To follow onto RyagonIV's reply, I agree that the singular- or plural-ness of lángos as an English term is unclear -- it could just as well be treated as a word that has the same form for both singular and plural, just like various other borrowed terms like hiragana (from Japanese) or native terms like deer. Or perhaps as RyagonIV suggests, it might be a non-count noun like bread; considering that an alternative way of talking about lángos in English that uses native English terms would be frybread, I like the non-count approach.

As I noted in an earlier comment, adding a qualifier like any should be acceptable in the English, but it also shouldn't be required.

@RyagonIV:

If we treat lángos here as an English term, we'd probably:

  • Lose the diacritics, since borrowed terms almost always do -- native terms don't use accents, and over time, the spellings of borrowed terms lose theirs too.
  • Change the spelling to fit English-language expectations -- this would probably become langosh.
  • More radically, change the term entirely and call this Hungarian frybread.
    ↑ I'll ignore this last one for purposes of deriving the plural form. :)

Given the above, the plural form would then probably be:

  • langoshes, if we treat this as a countable noun.
  • pieces of langosh, if we treat this as a non-count noun similar to bread.
April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

It's not precisely my translation, rather Duo's, but point taken. Though I believe that "lángos" can be taken an a mass noun in English. Much like "bread", which also appears in discrete units but is usually treated as a mass noun.

Come to think of it, if "lángos" is a count noun, how would you pluralise it? "Two lángoss"? "Lángoshes"? Or the Hungarian "Two lángosok"? Probably just "Two portions of lángos", but that's boring, and wouldn't necessarily render it a count noun.

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Great comment, Erik. I'm still going to write "lángos", though, because I'm a sucker for diacritics. :)

I have a question: how did you extract the specific comment IDs to directly link to comments instead just the entire forum? I haven't found a way to do that.

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/GergKiss246905

i guess if you say in a hungarian restaurant or fastfood stand 'frybread' they won't understand first. But if you say 'lángos' you will get it within 10 minutes :D

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

where does the "any" come from in the english translation? I would have translated semmi lángost with not any lángos.

August 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/96314081311257

EDIT: ErikAnderson3 says I'm wrong in this comment (see below.)

I believe in English you need a determiner in front of your noun in such cases. So "any lángos" or possibly "a lángos" (I don't know if that's accepted, the two versions mean the same, but this course aims for literal translations.) Anyway, you could say "nem látok semmi lángost" it means what you'd expect.

August 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikAnderson3

As a native English speaker and a professional translator, "I don't see langos" is perfectly acceptable. There is no qualifier or quantifier in the Hungarian, so there should be no requirement to have a qualifier or quantifier in the English. Including one could be acceptable, depending on context, but requiring "any" here is a mistake.

September 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/96314081311257

I'm not a native English speaker, so I have to take your word on it. Thanks :)

September 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/H5iu9uYG

How would you translate "I am not looking for lángos" ?

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Nem keresek lángost.
keres - to search, to look for; lát - to see

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/hunkev

I am English and have never heard of frybread only fried bread .

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

It's pretty hard to translate local food items, so I'd just stick with calling it "lángos". :)

March 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikAnderson3

Frybread is not uncommon in various parts of North America. It's made by creating a dough and then deep-frying it in oil. Technically, I suppose a doughnut is a kind of frybread.

Meanwhile, fried bread is bread that is sliced and then pan-fried, usually in a skillet.

April 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

How would I say "I see no langos?"

October 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

Usually a construction like that is translated as "Nem látok semmilyen lángost" in this course, basically "I see no (kind of) lángos".

But I'd say "I see no lángos" is a reasonable, albeit funny-sounding, translation of the original sentence.

October 24, 2018
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