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" est le pantalon du garçon ?"

Translation:Where are the boy's pants?

February 3, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArnieRoss

Since "pantalon" is singular in French, why isn't the answer, "Where is the boy's pants"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

Because, in English, "pants" is a plural word, so you need to use "are" (plural of "is")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Clemencia856229

In order to avoid the ambiguity, i think the translation should have been "where is the boy's pair of trousers". That is clearer and accepting


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/atiklamine

pour quoi devrons nous faire 'are' au lieux de 'is' : where are the ... au lieux de where is the ... ? merci pour d’éclaircir


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

In English "pants" is always in plural to mean the singular "pantalon".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eellrraatt

Where are the boy's pants? is that ok? what was that: Where are the boys' pants?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

le pantalon du garçon = one boy => the boy's pants

le pantalon DES garçonS = several boys => the boys' pants


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/montmorency

could you explain to me when we say "du", and when "de" ?( or smth like this ). i don't know if i remembered it well, but it was often in "food" section too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"du" is the contraction of "de-le" = basically "of the" (+ masculine noun)

It is used in 2 cases:

PARTITIVE - to express "a piece of, a part of", ie when you don't use (eat/drink) the whole object. Ex: je veux du vin = I want (some) wine - je prends de l'argent = I take (some) money.

COMPLEMENT OF A NOUN - to mean "of the" including the translation of English possessive cases. Ex: le chien du garçon = the boy's dog / the dog of the boy. Ex: le bas de la page = the bottom of the page


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EriSk8ter

''where is the pants of the boy?'' is a correct answer!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n6zs
  • 2069

In English, "pants" (and "trousers") are treated grammatically as plural, even when they refer to a single garment. Consider it payback for "Elle me manque" (I miss her).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paratroopa_bean

Why doesn't it accept trousers!? Pants is american, trousers is uk. Pants in the uk is underpants!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Where are the boy's trousers" is an accepted translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean168590

Trousers Pants same thing in English. Should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Where are the boy's trousers?" has been accepted for at least two years.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JosephMill332158

The common expression is America is "Where's the boy's pants," even though grammatically incorrect. I am an American educator. This is not up for debate.

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