"Sie muss es nicht essen."

Translation:She does not have to eat it.

2/3/2013, 2:48:31 PM

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lughat
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i wrote "she must not eat it" and it is accepted. So is it true? clearly 'must not' and 'do not have to' are different in meanings.

2/17/2013, 2:55:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
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I have the same question. Can anyone clarify this?

2/24/2013, 4:13:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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This is a false friend. "Sie muss es nicht essen" means "She does not have to eat it". It does not mean "She must not eat it". The German for "She must not eat it" is "Sie darf es nicht essen".

2/24/2013, 4:26:52 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/HealThySelf
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really for she must not eat it the correct way is Sie darf es nicht essen? I always thought 'darf' meant 'may', or 'to be allowed to'. example "darf ich essen" - May I eat? I'm more confused now

6/11/2014, 11:55:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/lambertsimnel
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I think you're correct about the meaning of the words, but not about how they fit together. I think of "sie muss es nicht essen" as meaning "it isn't the case that she has to eat it" and "sie darf es nicht essen" as meaning "it isn't the case that she may eat it".

10/19/2017, 2:18:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolZaczk

I'm happy to report that "She must not eat it" is no longer accepted, and am sad to say I'm still getting this wrong!

3/17/2015, 3:01:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolZaczk

Gaak. I'm still getting it wrong. What must I do to remember?

1/10/2019, 1:17:30 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
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Thanks, Christian! I'll report "She must not eat it" as wrong next time I see it.

2/24/2013, 4:29:28 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/AngryAce

and i wrote she musnt eat it and its not accepted :S

2/11/2015, 6:04:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrouttMarvin

I think "must not" is stronger than "may not"? How can one express the difference in German?

6/21/2014, 9:56:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
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I would suggest:

Sie muss es unbedingt nicht essen!

11/22/2014, 9:58:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/LB_StorM

I don't mean to be picky, but I love this word, and more people should keep it in mind. These are actually (false) cognates.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognate

3/2/2013, 8:23:15 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/absynce
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"She must not eat it" and "she does not have to eat it" have the same meaning in English, that is, they are synonymous. One English translation for "sie darf es nicht essen" is "she may not eat it". Another translation is "she is not allowed to eat it".

3/6/2014, 3:35:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
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""She must not eat it" and "she does not have to eat it" have the same meaning in English" This is NOT TRUE, as explored in several comments here.

3/6/2014, 11:22:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/BLPK
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If I understand you correctly DavidWalsh10, I completely disagree. If someone wanted to say the child was not required to eat it, they would not say "She must not eat it." They would say "She doesnt' have to eat it." At least that's all I've heard in 67 years of living the US.

1/12/2015, 9:51:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
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You are Absolutely correct!

10/26/2017, 8:34:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidWalsh10

While the majority seem to be in agreement here I must dissent slightly. Whilst it's strictly true that "she must not eat it" has the sense of being completely forbidden in most cases, I have heard it often used (perhaps incorrectly) by many people as in.. "ah she must not eat it", referring to children at a dinner table or some such conversation.

So while it may not be 100% technically correct it is sometimes used as a less than forbidden thing, influenced often by the tone of the sentence.

1/12/2015, 8:22:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/penguinchicken

2018 I wrote "She must not eat it" and was marked wrong.

7/27/2018, 2:49:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/RexVH
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I think part of the confusion is that, in the positive, the sentences have the same meaning. That is to say, She must eat it. She has to eat it ... mean that it is imperative that she eat it.

To say "she must not eat it" means that she is forbidden from eating it.
To say "she doesn't have to eat it" means that she can it, or she can not eat it; whatever is her preference.

4/3/2014, 6:03:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Both: "She must not eat it" and "She does not have to eat it." are given as correct but they have very different meaning. "Muss" looks like Eng. "must" but it's not given in the hovertext then it comes up as a correct answer. Will report it. Now, I see "must" is wrong (thank you Christian) .

7/16/2013, 8:01:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/hmackiernan
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This is probably of no help viz language learning, but this strikes me as a scope difference "She must (not eat) it" (She is compelled not to eat it, she is forbidden from eating it" versus "She (not-must) eat it" (She (is not compelled) to eat it); that is does the 'nicht' negate the 'must' or the 'eat'. It seems the sentence as written means 'She (not-must) eat it" (I know that's ungrammatical, just emphasizing where the 'not' applies.

2/19/2016, 1:53:46 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/deboutwest

I looked up the word 'muss' in several places and they each said it means 'must.' http://dict.leo.org/ende/index_en.html#/search=muss&searchLoc=0&resultOrder=basic&multiwordShowSingle=on https://translate.google.com/#de/en/muss http://www.duden.de/rechtschreibung/muss except here it says that it means 'to have to' http://dict.tu-chemnitz.de/dings.cgi?o=302;service=deen;query=muss;pos=v http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/german-english/muss

I'm thoroughly confused. It looks like we got our English word 'must' from this word which makes sense to me. Did it change meaning over the course of several centuries?

from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/must?s=t before 900; Middle English most (e), Old English mōste (past tense); cognate with German musste.

The word 'must' has synonyms which are 'have (to), need, ought (to), shall, should.

Thanks for any clarification!

1/1/2015, 4:00:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Raisinnoir
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"Muessen" implies obligation, right? So what the sentence means in English is clear "She doesn't have to eat it (implied: if she doesn't want to). Still it's easy to see how an English speaker would translate it as "She must not eat it." (implied: it would not agree with her).

1/15/2016, 5:23:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kdn
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I wonder if "She has not to eat it." sounds correct for native English speakers.

2/3/2013, 2:48:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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It does not.

2/3/2013, 4:14:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Menschenkind

What should it say instead? She doesn't need to eat it?

2/3/2013, 9:21:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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That definitely sounds more natural. ""She has not to eat it" sounds like it is taken from a Shakespearean play of some sort..."She has but not to eat it, m'lady"...or something along those lines. "She doesn't have to eat it" or "she doesn't need to eat it" both sound fine. "She has not to eat it" sounds really off.

2/3/2013, 10:22:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/kdn
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Thanks! Maybe I should start to write my first play. :)

2/3/2013, 11:52:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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I should add that my English is "Canadian" English....so I learned an unhealthy mix of British and American English...more American than British due to television. Maybe "she has not to eat it" would sound more acceptable to someone from the UK?

2/7/2013, 4:15:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Alliekitt
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I'm English-English, and I agree with Hohenems - 'she doesn't (does not) have to eat it'.

7/31/2014, 11:53:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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No, sorry not good Eng.

7/16/2013, 7:57:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cryptocloud

why essen do not imply 'they" instead of "she" ?

9/13/2013, 12:39:35 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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Sie muss es nicht essen = She doesn't have to eat it

Sie müssen es nicht essen = They don't have to eat it / You (formal) don't have to eat it

9/13/2013, 12:42:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMeyer2

I guess my feel for the placement of "nicht" is wrong. I would expect it to be "Sie muss es essen nicht" for the accepted meaning.

6/16/2016, 8:09:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve898881

She must not eat it, seems the more appropriate statement. Duo, you are getting more and more tricky!

6/22/2017, 8:28:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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But "She must not eat it" means, in English, that what she must do is "not eat it". (i.e. eating it is forbidden)

While in German, Sie muss es nicht essen, means that there is no "must". (i.e. eating is optional, not required)

English treats "not" a bit peculiarly in connection with "must".

6/22/2017, 8:32:56 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve898881

Danke fur hilfen

7/1/2017, 7:38:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SydneyBlak4

I am completely confused! Check the questions that followed this one: Ihr müsst zur schule gehen - you have to go to school (have to = must) Du musst jetzt tapfer sein - you must be brave now. Ihr müsst jetzt tapfer sein - you must be brave now. In all three of these questions the English translation for müssen was must.
Why does it now mean something else for the current question???

7/1/2018, 8:01:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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This has already been explained in this very discussion. Asking questions that have already been answered is a massive waste of everyone's time. Please always read the previous comments.

7/1/2018, 8:44:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SilentEyeTV

Maybe look at it like this:

In English, "she must eat it" would be the same as "she has to eat it"

So the sentence here is "she has to eat it not"

Or "she does not have to to eat it".

11/8/2018, 10:15:57 PM
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