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Can you explain me this part of " Hamlet " ??

Gertrude : good Hamlet cast thy nightly colour off , and let thine eye look like a friend on Denmark .do not for ever with thy vailed lids , seek for thy noble father in the dust ; thou know'st 'tis common , all that lives must die , passing through nature , to eternity . Can you explain me this part ? I think that English is very old , because writer of this story is William shakespear , But I want to understand the " Hamlet " very well . can you help me ?????

il y a 2 ans

9 commentaires


https://www.duolingo.com/P0nY0

that's called Early modern English "thy" means" your" , possesive of" thou" "thine" = this Despite I couldn't tell you more with an analysis as I have not read Hamlet myself , here is what seems a good one found on internet :

That's the actual exchange between Hamlet and his mother. When she urges him "cast thy nighted colour off," she's telling him literally to stop wearing black clothes (the color of night and also the color of mourning) and telling him figuratively to stop being so gloomy. When she tells him to "look like a friend on Denmark," she's asking him to have a better relationship with her new husband, Claudius. (It's fairly common in Shakespeare's plays for the King of Denmark to be called "Denmark," the King of England to be called "England," etc.) In the next two lines she's telling him not to walk around constantly with sad, downcast eyes ("veiled lids"), as if he were searching for his dead father on the ground. And the meaning of the two lines after that is pretty obvious. She reminding him that everybody dies, and that he therefore shouldn't be making such a big deal of mourning for his father, who has been dead now for more than a month.

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

yeh ! thanks for your explain P0nY0

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/Arcaeca
Arcaeca
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If it makes you feel better, most native English speakers don't understand a word of it :)

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/CommeuneTexane

Arcaeca has a point, it can be very difficult, even for most native speakers. There are books and classes on interpreting and understanding Shakespeare for English speakers. I had to read extensively and take college courses to better appreciate it. And I am a native English speaker! (My husband likes to watch Shakespeare's plays with me with the French subtitles, since it is easier for him to understand while reading the French. He's also a native English speaker.) Not to discourage you, but depending on where you are in your language skills, it may be a good idea to put Hamlet on hold for just little while, until you are comfortable in the language. You can always come back to it later. :)

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

Really ?????

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/Arcaeca
Arcaeca
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Modern English speakers understand Shakespeare so little that many printed versions devote an entire page to explaining what in the world the book is saying for every page that's actually part of the text. When you have to have your own language translated for you in order to read it, you can see why high school students hate reading Shakespeare so much. :)

il y a 2 ans

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hhhhhhh !!! this true ! thanks for information

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/CommeuneTexane

The language Shakespeare uses is Elizabethan English and is over 400 years old. Even for native English speakers, the language can be very challenging because some words have changed meaning during that time, other words are obsolete or no longer used (thee, thine, thou among many others), and there is symbolism and references in the plays that we may not be familiar with in this day and age. However, the plays are well worth the effort to understand, since they deal with universal themes and the human condition. Really great stuff, promise.

They are best watched acted out rather than read. In a live format some of the lines become much clearer in meaning because you can see the actors respond to the lines. Kenneth Branagh directed and acted in an excellent version of Hamlet. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116477/ Try watching that without straining to understand every word, just try to grasp the overall meaning.

Additionally you can read Shakespeare in the original format side by side a more contemporary "translation". http://nfs.sparknotes.com/ This site puts the words into modern use. The words lose some poetry of their original poetry this format, but if it is helpful for your understanding, use it.

Hope that helps.

As for myself, I <3 William Shakespeare. Good luck!

il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

Thank you so much for your help , yeeeh , that's it ,

il y a 2 ans