"A fiatal turista átlép egy másik városba."

Translation:The young tourist heads to another city.

August 17, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

What does átlép or head mean in this respect? (for the people, whose motherlanguage is neither hungarian, nor english)

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Imorth

This is a strange Hungarian sentence. Imagine two cities directly next to each other with a line marking the border. If you step over that line then you átlépsz egy másik városba.

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

:-) I thought, there might be a tunnel between the two cities or the tourists are running from one to the next place.

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

This "átlép" thing usually means some place that is very close, "just around the corner".

"I will just step over to the bank, I will be back in five minutes". - Not sure this is used like this in English. They might say "step out to run a quick errand". But Hungarians do say "Kilépek/Átlépek a bankba, 5 perc múlva jövök" - "I step out/over (to go) to the bank, I'm coming back in 5 minutes."
You can also use "átlépni a szomszédba/szomszédhoz" - "to step over to the neighbor".
Basically, a quick trip to a nearby location.

Now, the sentences above do not seem to match. "Átlép egy másik városba" sounds very strange to me. And "heads to another city" is different, to me.
I would say "A turista egy másik városba tart".

"Tart" (Hungarian) is an interesting verb, it has a few meanings. Here it seems like a good match for "heads". "Keeps moving toward a destination".

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

That's very interesting, thank you :-) !

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Right now, somebody invited me on the phone for lunch and then asked: "átjösz"? The restaurant is eight kilometers away. In this sense átlépni is something very close and átjönni if it is not.

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Or I would say "átjönni" can be any distance.
You can also "jump": "átugrasz?" It means a quick short action, to go over for a short time. You can also say "beugrasz". In English I would say you "stop by".

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Like Hajdúhadház and Téglás. The back of the "you are leaving" sign for one is the "you are entering" for the other. Spent a couple of minutes leaping from one town to the other. Átlépek indeed.

March 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/carolgoslen

In English we sometimes use the word "head" as a verb that means we are moving in the direction of something. For example, if I am meeting someone at a restaurant for dinner, I might send them a quick text to let them know I am moving in the direction of the restaurant to meet them. So my text would say "I am headed there now." or if "Heading over now". Or if making plans with friends for a certain time and then my spouse and I are discussing what time we need to leave we might say "We should head out 2:00" or "head over at 2:00" or "head that way at 2:00". I personally don't think "heads" is the right work to translate "átlép" because we also say "step over" to somewhere, especially if the idea is that it is not far. The English sentence they give is a typical way to say you are moving in the direction of another city, but it doesn't convey the same idea that "step over" would. You can use "head" in reference to long journeys as well. "The plane leaves at 3:00 so we should head to the airport about 12:00 in order to allow time for security." I hope all that makes sense and helpful.

May 8, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Yes, it makes perfect sense. And we can also say "we are heading South" as in we are moving in that direction. It could be a long trip.
And you are right, the translation is not exactly correct. I guess there could be several possible translation, depending on what "heads" exactly means. Is it "leaves"? Is it "is on his/her way"? I am still saying the closest match is probably "tart", which covers the intention, the direction and the action being in progress. But for the sense of leaving, I would use "elindul".
Another synonym for "tart" is "keep", in the sense of keeping a direction, as well:
"Jobbra tarts!" - "Keep right!" (on the highway)

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Tart/dauert/head ! Very interesting!

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Heading sounds like "aufbrechen" to a place in German. I never used this english word as yet. But it doesn't have the meaning of ÁT either. (RÜBERkommen, HINkommen). This discussion now, and the telephone call made it clear, what it means. THANK YOU ALL! :-)

May 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LeventeZso1

I think this translation is wrong - heading to a place - a hely felé tartani. I am a native hungarian living in Budapest, and never heard anybody saying átlép in this context or meaning - I'd translate átlép to cross e.g. a border (átlépni a határt).

July 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard604037

I put "steps across" and I accept that this might require very long legs! The model answer gives us "heads" which is a very new translation involving lep. In English we can happily say "heads across" to a new city thereby introducing at least an element of consistency. Otherwise, I can only assume that this is an example of how one word can be made into many others which is a common feature of language more generally. We've seen "fellep" as perform and "visszalep" as withdraw and now we seem to have atlep as head or head across. Is this a correct understanding?

December 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BigWayne19

------- i'm gonna hop over to the bank and then the grocery store. i'll be right back . . .

Big 10 mar 19

March 11, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Richard604037

Just out of interest I tried "heads ACROSS to another city." The computer wouldn't have it and that seems wrong.

December 7, 2018
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