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"Ólann ocht bportán uisce."

Translation:Eight crabs drink water.

2 years ago

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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Update: See the discussion below for (more?) relevant information.

The word is apparently from Greek "oktō". Entry on oktō(u) in The American Heritage Dictionary of English Language, 5th edition:

Eight. Oldest form [not historically attested] ok̑tō(u), becoming [not historically attested] oktō(u) in centum languages.
1a. eight, eighteen, eighty, from Old English eahta, eight, with derivatives eahtatig, eighty, and eahtatēne, eighteen (-tēne, ten; see dekm̥);
b. atto-, from Old Norse āttjān, eighteen (tjān, ten; see dekm̥). Both a and b from Germanic [not historically attested] ahtō.
2. Octans, octant, octave, octavo, octet, octo-, October, octonary; octodecimo, octogenarian, from Latin octō, eight.
3. octad, octo-; octopus, from Greek oktō, eight.
[Pokorny ok̑tō(u) 775.]

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmc3.5

Pardon? The word is absolutely not from Greek anything, it is from proto indo european, Nor do i understand what possible bearing the American Heritage Dictionary of the English language could possibly have on the derivation of an irish word, nor does the said dictionary claim either 'eight' or 'ocht' to be so derived; not in the passage quoted, and i can say with confidence and without checking any further, not anywhere within it.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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This comment was made two months ago, apparently, I simply assumed it was related to the Greek root, as the words look alike and the meanings match. However, Irish is on the side of Proto-European languages and it's perfectly possible I'm wrong. I should've checked an Irish etymology dictionary, which I still don't have access to.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmc3.5

Unfortunately i don't think there is an Irish etymological dictionary, I've looked, I wish there was. I think the RIA is supposed to be writing one but i think its due to be finished some time before the end of the century ... the electronic RIA dictionary online http://edil.qub.ac.uk/ can at least trace roots back to old irish, from there you have to take reconstructions of indoeuropean and guess. Wiktionary (if you can trust it) gives this guess https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Indo-European/o%E1%B8%B1t%E1%B9%93w . The words do indeed look almost the exact same and have the same meaning, but basic numbers are one thing it's very hard to believe a native speaker would borrow from another language ... there again English does have 'dozen'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aria487
Aria487
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I'm sorry to have taken this long, for some reason, I lost the link and forgot to reply.

It's sad that there isn't such dictionary. I suspected as much, but I'd never ran a serious search for it. The electronic RIA is nothing short of wonderful and I didn't know it existed, I'm ever grateful!

I agree with you, such basic words are very unlikely to be borrowed. This reminds me, there are words like مادر /maadar/ mother and دختر /dokhtar/ girl, daughter, دو /do/ two in Farsi, and we have evidence that these are original Persian, not borrowed. These are also basic words, and they look extremely similar to the words "mother", "daughter", and "dó"(Irish)/"Deux"(French). This is while Farsi is an Indo-European language, while Irish, English and French are, ultimately, Proto-European! I see no solution but to accept all (?) languages are relatives at some point!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmc3.5

Was there once one original world language, from which all others derived ... ? It's a nice thought, but one thing we can be certain of is that Irish and Farsi are distant cousins.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KittDunne
KittDunne
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All the languages you've mentioned are 'Indo-European ' (adj) languages. Proto Indo-European (noun) is the hypothetical reconstructed parent language of the family. Even if these languages are distantly related to other families that ancestor language is not called Proto Indo European

1 year ago