"¿Quiénes están nadando en el mar con él?"

Translation:Who is swimming in the sea with him?

5 years ago

52 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
lesliewilman
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Are we to infer that there is no difference in Spanish between "Quiénes están nadando" and "Quién está nadando"? If so why bother having singular and plural at all?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I am not sure what you are using as the basis for your inference, but your two example sentences are clearly different, one being "Who?" and one being "Who all?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lesliewilman
lesliewilman
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First, "Who all..."is something you would never hear in English. Secondly, the translation "Who are swimming in the sea with him?" was accepted as correct. The question implies that at least 3 people were to be seen swimming, él and the unknown "Quiénes". Had there been only two in the sea, the question would have been "Quíen está nadando....". The translation given as another correct solution is, at best, careless but, in my nit picking opinion, wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

I say "who all" only to distinguish between singular and plural, and I do hear people say it in English. I say "I am not sure" because I literally cannot see/did not know the responses you were speaking of. If we don't know how many people are swimming with him, how do we know to ask Quien or Quienes? I agree about the nit picking.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/windly
windly
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my answer "who are swimming in the sea with him" was not accepted

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The question word "who" is usually regarded as singular in English (outside of copula sentences like "Who are these people?"). "Who are swimming?" is not grammatical, even if you expect the answer to include multiple people.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/feanoRfelagunD

Brother man, next time when you feel like it is absolutely certain that your reasoning is sound, do not listen to that sensation, but rather ignore it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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In Spanish there IS a difference, it is in English that there is not!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlieBrown51

To be sure (I am not native English speaking): is that completely true? Can "Who are swimming..." also mean you are talking about a singular person? Or is it that "Who is swimming ..." can as well mean you are talking about one or more people, but "Who are swimming..." always relates to more people?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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"Who is" is used when there is no direct object, such as when it is immediately followed by a verb (like swimming), "there", or "that", or a singular direct object that is not "you".

"Who are" is used when the direct object is "you" (even if not plural!) and for plural direct objects.

The following are the correct usages... "IS": - "Who is singing those songs?" "Who is there?" "Who is that?" "Who is he/she?" "Who is your mother?"

"ARE": - "Who are you?" "Who are they?" "Who are Ed and Jill?" "Who are your parents?" "Who are you talking to?"

("What" is used for the same cases as "Who".)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

A correction. In "Who is swimming", the "who" is a subject, not an object.

In all the following cases, "who" is the subject:

Who is singing those songs?" "Who is there?" "Who is that?" "Who is he/she?" "Who is your mother?"

In this sentence, "Who called whom? ", "who" is the subject; and "whom" is the direct object (of the verb, "called".

Take this (somewhat) non-sense sentence:

"Who gave whom to whom?" "(Who gave (which slave) to (which owner)."

<pre>In this case, "who" is the subject",; "whom" is the direct object of the verb "gave"; and "whom is the object of the preposition "to". (And if the "to" were left out, then one "whom" would be an indirect object. ) </pre>

"Are" always goes with "you"., even if the "you" is singular. "Who are you?" "You are who?" But NOT "who is you" "You is who?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlieBrown51

I understand now. Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Frank234234

"¿Quiénes están nadando en el mar con él? " Who is swimming in the sea with him? --Indicates, that I know that at least two persons are swimming with him?

¿Quién está nadando en el mar con él?" Who is swimming in the sea with him? -- I know it´s one person with him?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Are you asking that as a question? Yes, it's mostly correct. If you know there are multiple people involved, you use quiénes. If you don't know how many there are, or if it's only one, you use quién.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wwj101
wwj101
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Who are swimming was not accepted in April 2018. I knew it sounded weird, but I got caught up in the notion of word for word translation

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dawn277745

If I needed to ask this question (either way, knowing or not knowing the amount of people swimming), I would just ask, "Who's swimming in the sea with him?" or "Who else is swimming in the sea with him?" The specifics of how many people there are will be clarified as soon as someone answers my question. FYI, I'm a native New Yorker.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulSantuc

My 'Who are' was not accepted

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Who are [doing a thing]?" is not considered good English. "Who" and "what" are generally regarded as singular (outside of copula sentences).

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

There seems to be a lot of debate here, just accept that ''quiénes están'' can be translated as who is or who are in English depending on the rest of the sentence. We would say ''who are those people, swimming with him ? Hey, they're not people they're sharks!'', but we wouldn't say ''Who are swimming with him?'' as some people here try to do. Just one of those things, unfortunately. English seems to require a plural point of reference in the sentence if ''are'' is going to be used, and there is no such reference in Duo's example. In real life, if we wanted to make it clear that there were two or more people around our target swimmer, we would add more words, as in my example above.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneZahra

The program proposes this as a correct answer: "Who has swimming in the ocean with him?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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Yeah, report that!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

No. Not at all. "Who has swimming" is non-sense, in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus_Pete

Who are they? Who are swimming in the sea with him?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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Who IS swimming in the sea with him... because there is no direct object. "Who are" is used only in cases when there is a direct object and it is either "you" or plural. (Example conversation: -"They are at the door." -"Who is?")

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cactus_Pete

Ah, makes sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Again, in "who is at the door", the "who" is the subject. There is no direct object.

"is" is a "linking verb". (a "being" verb). It does not have a "direct object". A direct object has to follow transitive (and non-linking) verb. It (direct object) has to follow (be the object of) an "action" (doing) verb. "Is" is not a "doing"; it simply "is"

Linking verbs (is, are, was, were) do not have objects.

See this website on "subject" of sentences: http://www.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/subjects.htm. It's a great website http://www.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/verbs.htm

See this site on "objects" of sentences: http://www.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/objects.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KarelSr

Reading the comments I note that all are, without exception, about English grammar rather than Spanish!! And the dispute on English grammar seems to be rather intricate without a clear conclusion.

As I am trying to learn Spanish and the correct English translation is disputable at best, "who are" is a better translation than "who is" because it is closer to the Spanish!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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I have to disagree on both counts. Ryagon's comment (currently directly above yours) is probably the best and most concise explanation:

"Who", as a question word, is generally regarded as singular in English, unless it's a copula sentence of the form "Who is/are [noun]?", like "Who are these people?" So it's always "Who is swimming?"

Earlier in the comments Ryagon has also mentioned the following, specifically regarding the Spanish:

If you know there are multiple people involved, you use quiénes. If you don't know how many there are, or if it's only one, you use quién.

These two comments highlight the difference between English and Spanish in this matter, and why "who are" as a literal translation is not better than "who is" as a correct translation.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ewdWxlwl

This is a bad example of teaching somebody a new language! Quienes están nadando is "Who are swiming". Even if you think that your translation is correct, what en example to Use!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil712772

I used the plural form because of quiénes, and not quién, and got dinged for it. Does DL think the rules don't apply to them. I sometimes get so p.o.ed that I feel like quitting this app, but sanity pervails and all is well. I find Spanish hard enough without these roadblocks cropping up. Sorry for venting, gang, but there it is.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"The plural form" of what? The only thing that the plurality of quién has an influence on in this sentence is the conjugated verb, so either está or están. Everything else stays the same.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael189866

Phil712772 probably means that he used are (plural) and not is (singular), like many others.

5 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

Who are swimming in the sea with him ... is now rejected and 'who is' given as the correct answer ... another heartless (!) heart loss from DUO :-(

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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Although as you can see from the comments, many English-speakers are confused about this, in proper English grammar it is incorrect to use "Who are swimming" (unless you add a direct object, so "Who are the people swimming in the sea" is correct). Without an object, "Who is swimming" is the correct form.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarethViejoLento

I think that 'the people swimming in the sea' is a complement rather than an object in your example as it's a copular verb? X is Y, X are Y. I now realise that the 'are' in the original sentence is not copular - the verb is 'are swimming', intransitive - so I apologise to DUO and accept the singular is right.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hg3UVt
hg3UVt
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Por que no " whom are swimming in the sea with him" ??

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Whom" solo se usa para objetos, pero en esta frase buscamos un sujeto. Además, "who", como palabra interrogativa, solo hay en singular en el inglés.

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harinderchahal1

Who here is plural, so who are swimming in the sea with him?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"Who", as a question word, is generally regarded as singular in English, unless it's a copula sentence of the form "Who is/are [noun]?", like "Who are these people?" So it's always "Who is swimming?"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fotopala

The correct answer should be, Who are swimming in the sea with him?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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I don't think I've ever heard anyone say it like that. "Who are the people swimming in the sea with him?" or "Who are the ones swimming in the sea with him?" would seem more natural.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

Or "Who is swimming in the sea with him?"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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Yeah!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pgouskov

"Who is" is grammatically correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"Who is" is grammatically correct if the "who" refers to only one person.

"Who are" is grammatically correct if more than one person (they) "are" swimming.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sr.Sotiros

if you saw a group of people swimming with him you could easily point to him and ask your friend - who are swimming in the sea with him?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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Sure, you could easily ask that, but it wouldn't make it technically correct. Read Dana-Nova's response to CharlieBrown below for a good explanation, or this from A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language: "Interrogative who and what as subjects normally take a singular verb even when the speaker has reason to believe that more than one person or entity is involved." There is an exception: "However, a plural verb may be used if other words in the sentence indicate that a plural subject is expected in the answer." So, even for a group, "Who is swimming?" unless more information shows a plural subject is expected, eg. "Who is/are swimming in those lanes?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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Still doesn't sound right to my ears. "Who are the/those people swimming in the sea with him?", sure.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dana-Nova
Dana-Nova
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That is because when you add "people" into the sentence, you give it a plural direct object, and then "Who are the people swimming" is correct -- that would be the way you emphasize that you are asking about multiple people swimming. ...Otherwise, if you DON'T use a direct object (to emphasize that there are multiple people) "Who is swimming" is correct English whether or not you happen to expect there to be multiple people in the answer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisLT2

I agree that "Who is" is gramatically correct, but the Spanish goes out of its way to show that it's expecting a plural answer, so I think the plural English "Who are" should not be rejected as incorrect. Apart from anything else, it shows total understanding of the Spanish, which is what we are here for. This isn't meant to be an English lesson. Also, I feel sure I can imagine situations where "Who are" would be more natural English. And, Duolingo frequently expects and offers only very stilted English answers.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catchingsignals
catchingsignals
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Makes sense now that you've explained it, thanks! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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I think this is correct even though it's rarely heard. There just doesn't happen to be a large literature about swimming with companions.

4 years ago
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