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  5. "אנחנו עדיין מחכים למשיח."

"אנחנו עדיין מחכים למשיח."

Translation:We are still waiting for the Messiah.

August 19, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alonzo86

משיח גם לא מטלפן..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiegoCrden3

Hahaha first thing in my head too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chanaj2

'Awaiting' is another way of saying 'waiting for'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roderickbl

Still not allowed in May 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Otto283955

I remember when the terror attack blasted the Sbarro cafe Jaffa - King George Street corner in the heart of Jerusalem, a little boy was the only surviver of his whole family. At the eulogy he said ,,when Moshiach comes all things will be fine". So true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snommelp

Dumb question, could this be a messiah, or is this the sort of word that only ever appears as definite "in the wild"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZakharYah

I think it should depend … there are other anointed one (Maschiach) figures in TaNaKh … the Hebrew characters would be the same (not necessarily capitalized, you know) … Sha'ul (Saul) or David for example were other anointed ones in the Bible … my anointed one would be משיחי …

Also the term for how Christians are supposed to be in Hebrew - Messiah followers - would be like Maschichiyim … משיחיים …

If you keep in mind the meaning of the term relating to meshakh (to anoint) & that in Hebrew the letters don't have to be capital or lowercase, hopefully it should become clearer for you from that purpose.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/J99Barker

In other contexts, it can be a more lose term for an annointed one, be it a utensil or a king, both seen in the Bible. In this context though with waiting for Mashiach, it is a title given to the person who will restore the Davidic monarchy along with some other things, so it is always the Messiah in English translation where the word Messiah has taken on its meanings and connotations. In common Jewish usage of English though, they will say the Hebrew Mashiach or Moshiach where Ha is often, but not always left off. If you look up the Chabad banner you can see an example.

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