"Befordulok és alszom."

Translation:I am turning to the wall and going to sleep.

August 19, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

I'm unclear on the idiom here. Is "befordulok" really "turn to the wall"? I'm wondering if the similarity with the English idiom "I'm turning in" ( = "I'm going to bed") is accidental or not.

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dragoncurve

I see a strong similarity to a word we use in Austria (reindrehen), which means to cuddle up inside your blankets.

It's to turn within and with your blanket to make it lie tightly around you. I can't say that this is the meaning of the word in Hungarian, but it's a mirror translation to German and would fit to the situation.

This still won't explain why they came up with the wall in the English sentence, though, in practice, if your bed stands next to a wall and you cuddle up turning to the side, you often do it ending up facing the wall, to feel even more cuddled up. i.e. turn to the wall and sleep.

Still, it's an unguessable translation. I'm sure nobody will ever get this at the first try.

October 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

Perhaps the corresponding phrase in (at least American) English is "I curl up and go to sleep"?

There's also "I roll over and go back to sleep" (for when you wake up in the middle of the night, but decide not to get up), but I'm guessing that is different.

October 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dragoncurve

spot on. I think "I curl up and go to sleep" is the best translation I've seen in this discussion yet. I'd modify it to "I curl up and sleep", though.

I guess 'curl up' was in the back of my mind when I wrote 'cuddle up' instead. :-/

October 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

It's a nice translation, but befordul here really means 'to turn inward', to create a rather closed space, with the wall in front of you.

October 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/KatjaJuliannova

I think this means something like 'I turn inwards' (that being in the direction of the wall if you're in a bed that's against a wall on one side?). the wall isn't specifically mentioned and, the similarity to the English idiom 'to turn in' is probably coincidental...not sure about any of it though.

September 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/antipythagoras

I am also puzzled with this one. What does 'turning to the wall' mean and how do we get a wall from the prefix 'be' without any nouns in the sentence?

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/eyepatch1

Aaaaaah! No wall!

October 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fiderallala

Interesting parallel that in English to say "I am turning in" means "I am going to bed". Originally something to do with turning a boat towards shore for the night, I believe.

July 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Duo accepts " I turn in and sleep." 5 October 2017

October 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric599017

Well, it didn't accept I am turning in and sleeping.!

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Yes - but you can't really say that. You can say "I am turning in and going to sleep" - but "I am turning in and sleeping" implies both happen at the same time whereas one follows the other.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric599017

I am going to the park and playing.

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

No - you can't say that either :-)

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric599017

And you wouldn't say half the things that Duolingo says either!

March 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/MojitoGreen

Now, -m vs -k, why is it befordulok és alszom? I have read that alszom is an official version, but it does not have a direct object, so can"t one use "alszok" too?

August 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

This is different. "Alszom" is an "-ik" type verb. Third person singular suffix is "-ik": "alszik". These verbs usually have the "-m" ending in the first person singular, and it is still an indefinite ending (no object). Basically, the 1st singular definite and indefinite suffixes match.

The other verb, "befordulok", is not an "-ik" type verb, so it gets the regular "-ok" ending.

Check the discussions for more on this topic.

August 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

In informal speech I think you can use alszok. But when writing use alszom.

May 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

You should also say alszom unless you want to sound like a hinterlander. :´)

May 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/FarkasJozs5

Why is the idea with the "wall" necessary?

July 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

I don't know if I should answer that from the Hungarian or the English point of view. :´)

The Hungarian befordul means that you're turning "inwards" in bed, creating more or less a closed space between your face and the wall next to the bed. English doesn't have a good expression for that, it doesn't call the directions in bed "inward" and "outward", but "to the wall" and "away from the wall".

July 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sava324463

Just a big editors mistake.. Again!

March 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Banjodancs

As my bed is in the middle of the room and i sleep on the window side, guess which way i turn- never ever to the wall

March 20, 2019
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