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  5. "הגבר מערבב את הקפה שלו."

"הגבר מערבב את הקפה שלו."

Translation:The man is mixing his coffee.

August 21, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

@Trevorist: "stir" is a valid translation in this context, though לבחוש might be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/owlinthebox

I heard some native speakers saying "mearvev" instead of "mearbev" :/ Which one is preferable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJ.ORTEGA

Same doubt, what would be the correct pronounciation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrspizza

Mearbev would be the correct one. mearvev is just some sort of slang


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I may have heard /mearvev/ only as a joke, as a deliberate mispronunciation. It may have already leaked into serious speaking and I've missed it...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anglozion76

Whether the Hebrew means 'mix' rather than 'stir' it's a poor translation to keep it 'mix' in English. No-one has ever 'mixed' their coffee in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hadassah277241

Absolutely agree. The translation should be stir. Maybe you mix your coffee in Hebrew but in English you stir it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

What if you create a, well, mix, of beans for grinding?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

Hmm Yarden, it just so happens that I mix regular and decaf instant coffee and put it in a jar so it will be ready for my morning coffee time, when I stir a portion with hot water.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/trevorist90

Is the word 'stirs' valid here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

Not exactly, I would translate "stir" as בוחש.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaryJaneKe4

The man stirs his coffee or The man is stirring his coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Definitely בוחש is more precise, but I dare bet that in everyday speech Israelis more often מערבבים than בוחשים their coffee.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pousnika

Could that verb be considered a pi'el construction with ע-רב-ב as root? Cos we've come across many verbs with more than 3 root letters and I was wondering if we could categorise them this way or if Duo has a whole other section on "longer verbs" that I'll discover later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChickenRunner02

I was wondering if ע-ר-ב is of the same root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Yes, the Pilpel עִרְבֵּב was formed by doubling the last consonant of the root ערב. You find it in the Aramaic part of the Bible ‏חזיתה פרזלא מערב בחסף טינא Dan 2.41you saw the iron mixed with the potter’s earth. Modern Hebrew uses עֵרֵב in the sense of to involve: הַאִם הַתׇּכְנִית שֶׁלְּךָ מְעָרֶ֫בֶת רוֹבֶה Does your plan involve a rifle?

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