1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "L'orologio si è fermato."

"L'orologio si è fermato."

Translation:The clock has stopped.

February 7, 2014

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shahin.Shah

then what is the usage of si here ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

It's the reflexive pronoun. Fermarsi

http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/italian-english/fermarsi

Reflexives need the pronoun to agree with the subject. If you aren't familiar with them it's worth a read. This was one of those pieces of grammar I wasn't able to intuitively pick up.

http://italian.about.com/od/verbs/a/italian-verbs-reflexive.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey855877

With all verbs that use the essere auxiliary, the past particle must agree with the subject, and reflexive verbs always use essere - a subset of the category.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul604

Is the reflexive "si" totally necessary?

If we just said "L'orologio è fermato" (without the si), would we be saying that the watch had stopped something else, then? (Such as, stopped a bullet, or something!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/P_J_L

yes it is necessary Fermarsi is a different verb to Fermare Fermare - io ho fermato la macchina = I stopped the car Fermarsi - la machhina si è fermata = the car stopped itself (in the sense that it broke)

ps if you wanted to say the watch stopped something you would need the auxiliary Avere - L'orologio ha fermato qualcosa


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EugeneDavid

thanks for this clarification.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariaelena256

when do you use "essere" or avere with fermato. I am confused


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jifabulix

I'll try minimise the jargon. Use avere when the verb is doing something to an object e.g. kicked a ball. Use essere when the verb isn't doing something to an object e.g. the party started. Use essere instead of avere when the verb is doing something to an object which is itself e.g. I wake up (myself, not someone else)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudeMedearis

Bless you, kind stranger. It's about time somebody explained English in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveVelo1

It would appear there are many language educators using this site who employ grammar terms to explain word usage. This does not really help those who do not possess similar training, and could add to the confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boudicca23

Indeed - in the UK we are not taught grammar terms for parts of sentences other than the basics - nouns, verbs, adverbs - so I have found that many, many explanations on Duolingo forums go completely over my head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danielconcasco

Language educator here. Ask us for clarification if you don't know the terms. We are happy to explain. It's our job to teach grammar in plain terms and to teach the grammar terms.

Feel free to ask me about any grammar any time. Post on my stream. And that goes for anyone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ephraimwaters

That goes for linguistics majors as well. Heck, I'm just here for kicks. It's a hobby. Don't really care about the science.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lavmarx

Whenever you have a reflexive you use the verb "essere" instead of "avere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danireboucas

Is 'fermato' a reflexive verb? I.e. one that is broken always breaks itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanKing1

"Fermare" would be transitive, not reflexive, if it takes an object, such as "I stopped the car" = "Ho fermato la macchina". But "I stopped" would be "Mi sono fermato". I think "to break" = "rompere" is treated similarly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iSkyeSilverweb

I very frequently say, "The clock is stopped." I know that is a common usage in English, so I was surprised to be told it was wrong in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KenHutley

I put 'The clock is stopped' which is how we might say it in England....marked incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NadiaRausc

I wonder how we would progress without the educated help of some of the commentators.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheBigE1980

Is "the clock has stopped itself" also acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TerreyP

Not sure if that would be accepted but in English you would have to say, "The clock stopped by itself." The clock has stopped itself.... from doing something else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zacharyz13

For me, it was not accepted, exactly as you wrote it. I am guessing that it means the verb is reflexive in italian (requiring the object) but not in a way the required the english translation as such


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirYousif

Why my respond is wrong i wrote is stopped


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcgeejp

So did I. This would have been correct 100 years ago but is not now accepted. English has simplified this construction out of existence. It is only found in old songs("Joy to the world, the Lord is come.") and literature, sometimes poetry. I guess we are just out of our time and the world has passed us by.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaudeMedearis

Is anyone singing a song while answering this one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasmine980387

If you put batteries in it will probably work lol:)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jasmine980387

I thought they said that it will never brake :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoToutin

what about 'the watch did stop' ? why is it not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarsawWill

The normal Past simple would be "the watch stopped." Your sentence is possible as an emphatic structure, known as emphatic do, and usually used to correct someone:

"The watch didn't stop" - "The watch did stop"

But there's no suggestion of that meaning here.

I know Spanish has a special structure equivalent to emphatic do involving sí (yes) - "El reloj sí se paró"

Perhaps Italian has something similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

ALWAYS CONFUSED BY THOSE REFLEXIVES


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzh2015

The watch halted. Is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gene10111

The same : "il tempo si e fermato" -earlie was translated as "the time stopped" (without "has"). Why ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liz22ancona

Why was The watch has stopped. marked as wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnthonyDiNome0

is si needed because fermato is a refexive verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike867080

Why can't this be "The watch is stopped"? Would using "fermato' as an adjective mean it shouldn't be reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rjjacob

This is almost like the colloquial but poor English construction, "the clock, it has stopped."

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.