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  5. "חולצתי רטובה."

"חולצתי רטובה."

Translation:My shirt is wet.

August 24, 2016

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kongekrabbe

So is this a generally applicable rule for possessives? Adding a ת as a binding consonant when the word ends on a vowel?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

The ה turns into ת for female objects (חולצה - חולצתי) but is omitted for male (עלה - עלי)

The א is sometimes omitted (אבא - אבי) but not always (כסא - כסאי).

A וֹ (kholam) would add an א, while a ו (vav) would act like other consonants.

A י would act like any consonant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirLFC

Only when it ends with ה, not every vowel. Very similar to ة in Arabic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kongekrabbe

Thank you. I have not studied Arabic, but good to know :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romeyjondorf

No, it's that חולצה (shirt) is a female word :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpzlearner

Why isn’t this “my wet shirt”? Isn’t “my shirt is wet, חולצתי היא רטובה ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

My wet shirt would be חולצתי הרטובה. You can think of חולצתי as החולצה שלי: just as with החולצה שלי, when adding an adjective it must be definite (come with 'ה as a prefix).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bpzlearner

Thanks. This is helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

The adjective רָטֹב has also the variant feminine form רְטֻבָּה [rtuba] with a plosive /b/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YHalperin1

Do people really talk this way? חולצתי and not החולצה שלי?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

In short, no - people don't talk like this. But the possessive suffix is very common in writing and formal speech.

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