1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: German
  4. >
  5. "Er braucht keinen Schlaf."

"Er braucht keinen Schlaf."

Translation:He does not need any sleep.

February 7, 2014

47 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KiraOcc

Keinen, kein, keine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hontt

kein-masculine/neuter, keine-feminen/plural, keinen- masculine (accusative). just like ein, eine, einen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaA2

Kein... Here When you can use kein, keine, keinen, .... Illustrative image :))).. http://im55.gulfup.com/nzXEa0.png


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArdaOzkul

Ich brauche keinen Schlaf, ich brauche Antworten


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvelan

Why is it keinen here and not nicht? "Er braucht Schlaf nicht."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AestaAnca

I was taught that if its a noun, it becomes kein + noun, if its an action its action+ nicht


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marisa369767

Yes, that makes sense. "Nicht" could work like this, but doesn't sound correct: Er braucht den Schlaf nicht.

So use "keinen"!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaA2

Isn't it because of "any"?

And i think if you gonna use "nicht" It will be" Er braucht den Schlaf nicht ".

In general we use kein to negate indefinite noun. otherwisewe use nicht ( like to negate verb, definite article noun, ...)

If I have something wrong tell me, please..

:)))..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arhowe00

This is why. In the sidenote, it said that a sentence will use "Kein" if the subject has no article. Because it is just "Er", this makes it right to use "Kein", even if "He does not need a sleep" doesn't make sense. In almost all other circumstances, you would use nicht, except for if what your negating has an indefinate article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnishKanch

Even I have this doubt. Someone please explain!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurefindil

What's the problem with he doesn't need a sleep?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

He needs sleep. He does not need sleep. He does not need any sleep.

In this case, "sleep" is an abstract noun about the state of being asleep. It is not countable and does not take the indefinite article "a" or the definite article "the".

Note that "He is asleep" means that he is sleeping.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nutellasuechtige

I think the "Er" sounds like "Ihr"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aniloveslegolas

Did you mean Legolas?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/originaldon3

Why is 'he requires no sleep' not acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laurefindil

Duolingo is too unsophisticated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roman2095

"he needs no sleep" works so I assume DL didn't like your use of "requires"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhineasGSquire

It is trying to get us to learn specific words, not just potential synonyms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

require = erfordern, according to the online Larousse English-German dictionary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_aicirtaP

Because that's too elaborate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rama_abazid

keinen is for masculine.. then here schlafe: why it's {keinen shlafe}???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LearnerSojourner

Schlaf (sleep) is masculine (der), so in the akkusative ("He needs no sleep", 'sleep' being the object of 'he'), becomes -den, and words when with -en. Kein + en = keinen Schlaf.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marisa369767

Es gibt keine Mehrzahl von Schlaf, also kein Schlafe oder Schläfe oder Schlafs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyaA2

النفي في الألمانية بالصور التوضيحية مع أمثلة Die Negation, الكلمات الدالة على النفي Negationswörter, اعراب kein

http://learneasilygerman.blogspot.com/2015/02/die-negation.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jer77od

I'm understood that verbs that are turned into nouns are neutral. Why is sleep (schlafen --> Schlaf) masculine? Or is this one of those "just because that's the way it is", as many of the German rules?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

I think that rule applies when nominalizing more modern verbs. Schlaf, however, is such an old word, that--as you noted--"just is".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MsJoyMaeda

How would you say, "He does not need TO sleep"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystofBoh

I think that would be "er braucht nicht zu schlafen". If you want to learn more, try looking up for "infinitiv mit zu", at least that's what we used to call it at school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/az_p
Mod

    Er muss nicht schlafen has the same meaning (it doesn't mean "he must not sleep").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KrystofBoh

    Would it be also possible to say "he needn't sleep" or "he needn't any sleep"? Duo doesn't accept either of them and I realise it's sort of an old fashioned way, but is it grammatically correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

    If you translate it that way--which does capture the meaning/concept--you are transforming sleep (a noun: der Schlaf) into a verb, also "sleep" (schlafen).

    So the more faithful translation to "He needn't sleep" would be "er braucht nicht zu schlafen", oder vielleicht "er braucht schlafen nicht."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathyPinner

    Why is "He doesn't need a sleep" wrong? This is quite normal English though it means something slightly different. It's what you'd say to a baby sitter, for example. If it's wrong, how do you say "He doesn't need a sleep."
    To me "He does not need any sleep" suggests he never needs to sleep.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jer77od

    because "he doesn't need a sleep" is quite not normal English. He does not need any sleep doesn't sound to me as if he never needs sleep. "He never needs sleep" would fit, but, to answer your question, I don't think is possible. I think that would be "Er braucht einen Schlaf nicht" which I'm understood is not grammatically correct. -native English speaker


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CathyPinner

    Well I'm a native speaker also. I've often said he/she doesn't need a sleep. I doubt I've ever said "he does not need any sleep." It's such a false statement. Everyone needs sleep but they may not need a sleep this afternoon. Perhaps it's an Americanism to say "he doesn't need any sleep." when you mean "he doesn't need a sleep."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat211087

    I totally agree with CathyPinner. I and my associates would say "he does not need a sleep" when talking about a day time nap ( for any age). My initial thought on reading "he does not need any sleep", was that he was a robot, so never slept. I can accept that some people may use the latter phrase, but please Duolingo, include "a sleep" in your database too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marisa369767

    Das klingt eindeutig nach "Ihr" und nicht nach "Er".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jill337098

    We frequently say "he doesn't need a sleep" in Oz. Sleep can have an indefinite article here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Steve32837

    Did my employer write this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tlc.mango

    Require and need are the same thing.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom318481

    I wish I could go on like this.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DarkJustRed

    Well I guess he really doesn't need it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grant30

    Necrosleep anyone?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PerfectParagon

    SLEEP IS FOR PUSSIES. :D


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zengator

    And obscenity and vulgarity are for bars, whorehouses, and--if you so choose--your own home; but not for a place where other people's children come to learn.

    Learn German in just 5 minutes a day. For free.