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  5. "My fridge is in the kitchen."

"My fridge is in the kitchen."

Translation:Мій холодильник на кухні.

August 25, 2016

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alkimeer

This is a little strange to me because 'на' means 'on the' and 'у' means 'in the', 'inside of the'. Are there any different meanings of vocabulary in this situation?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SergioRuido

Both на кухні and у кухні are used. The meaning is the same..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rocketotakuboy

How can I tell wether to end the word with у or not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sagitta145

Normally "-у" is the ending for the Accusative form of a feminine noun. So you should look at the noun and check: Is the noun feminine? Is it an object of some verb i.e. the action is done to it, it's receiving the action? If both are "yes", then you add "у"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dave626175

This kind of conversation has been bothering me for about 70 years: Мій холодильник vs. ні 'холодИльник'. whether the Cyrillic letter: И is correct in "fridge" (english) - or і (the Cyrillic one). When I was 15 I learned there was a book in Winnepeg on how to learn English from UKRANIAN - so I ordered it - and read the "English" (in Cyrillic letters) - and figured out how to get from English to Ukranian? Why? - I must be weird??? - Just for the "hell of it". (Some of my friends spoke Ukranian, Polish, Russian - they'ed come from some place else.) I ended up learning a lot of Ukranian "roots" - consonantal sounds - that connect with regular words in German, English - even - French - Norwegian - etc. and Ukranian is very cosmopolitan - you can figure out Russian, Czech, Polish, Slovenska (what I call some stuff I've heard from people from Latvia) - or people who told me they were from "White Russia". Anyway, my activities would be simplified if I could find a copy of the Cyrillic Alphabet somewhere - so I didn't have to go pick letters out of previous lessons - and string them together to make Ukranian words. (Smart people don't have the kinds of problems I have. I remember in a Sheltered Workshop (where they put crazy people) in one American "state mental health facilities " - and my pal Karl who is fluent in Slovenska (what I call it) - and a poor man turned and said, (he needed "Bread") - and he said: "Bread" in some kind of Slavic dialect - and I said, "Isn't he just saying he wants something to eat?" Karl shook his head, scowled at me, and handed him a slice of bread. The man said, Dyak...something - to Karl. After everybody went back to the "shelter" - I said, "Wasn't he asking for bread?" Karl said, "Yeah." The following week I sat in on a clinical rounds (Grand Rounds - where they study behaviour problems) in which the "Rounder" presented on "folie a deux" (a weird - rare - I guess - dx) - about a mom and a son who were from Lithuania - I was sitting next to the head of the Med school - and muttering under my breath - "His DX sounds to me like the way the miners in their families talk and behave towards each other over in the mines." This is a Diagnosis? "What's this really about?" The old (wise old man) looked at me: Whether the candidates' presentation is "correct or not" is what the management committee says...." All this is very serious: all I want to know is: Where can I find a copy of the Cyrillic Alphabet so I don't have to go back and pick letters out of words in sentences I've previously memorized? Dyakyoo za vce. Thanks, y'all. Dave

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