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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MABBY

Pronunciation anomaly with plural of simpatico?

The masculine singular form of the English adverb "nice" is simpatico.
That is a hard "c" sound at the end.

Lui è simpatico.

The feminine singular form of the English word "nice" is simpatica.
That is a hard "c" sound at the end.

Lei è simpatica.

But when I encountered a sentence with the plural form, the Duolingo program only accepted either: simpatiche or simpatici.

Call me crazy, but I thought that we were supposed to carry the hard "c" sound forward, through all of the cases. We did that on the feminine plural, so I have no issues there.
But simpatici adds the "h" sound in English to soften the "c".
Should it not have been simpatichi? Or is this an actual anomaly in pronunciation, where we go to the soft "c" (ch sound) for masculine plural?

August 26, 2016

7 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoFaber

When the stress is on the third to last syllable, -co and -go become -ci and -gi. There are exceptions of course - these words can be tricky even for native speakers - but that's generally how it works :)

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/necronudist85

Most famously this is hard with jobs: psicologi, dermatologi... many people use -ghi or are in doubt.

August 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Rensie_

When the word refers to person to the plural it finishes in - gi

Psicologo -psicologi

Dermatologo - dermatologi

Sociologo - sociologi

When it refers to thing it finishes in -ghi

Decalogo -decaloghi

Monologo - monologhi

Catalogo - cataloghi

This rule is valid for the words that finish with the suffixes -logo and -fago http://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/fago-logo-plurale-dei-nomi-in_(La-grammatica-italiana)/

September 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fede_br

Masculine plural is "simpatici" with the soft sound, so Duo is correct. There are also other cases like the, one very common example is "amico/amica, amici/amiche". A rule is explained in http://italian.about.com/od/nouns/fl/formation-of-italian-plural-nouns-ending-in-co-and-go.htm

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoFaber

Wow that's a really good website, well done!

August 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MABBY

You know, I never even considered amici being different.
So this wasn't so odd, after all.
Thank-you for the confirmation!

August 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RJ_G

Well, I learned something. Thanks all! (I would have thought -chi as well and amico/ci never occurred to me either.)

August 27, 2016
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