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https://www.duolingo.com/Dinnamarca

Spanish Loanwords in Turkish

Hello everyone, As I am learning Turkish(not on Duolingo,I am having some private lessons at home),I have noticed some Spanish words in Turkish,which really amazed me!Such words include lavabo(lavabo in Spanish!),banyo(baño) and koridor(corridor and this one is in English,too).Moreover there is also a considerable amount of French words(Kuafor,Garaj,Mesaj,Alerjik,Nostaljik etc).Also Turkish has helped me to get a better understanding of my own languages,Greek,which has borrowed an array of Turkish words(more that you can think of!)I love this language!

1 year ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Turkish has influenced many languages across South East Europe and has been influenced also by Spanish, French, Arabic and Farsi. I think this is very cool too

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dinnamarca

Yes!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sie00
Sie00
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I think the Romance influence comes in a great amount from French, while French and Spanish share many similarities. For that reason I think a lot of apparent borrowings could seem like they are from Spanish but really are, from French. For example, resepsiyon. Banyo could be from the Spanish, baño, or the Italian, bagno.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lars200
Lars200
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If you're interested in how all the French words ended up in Turkish, I can recommend this article: https://dhfles.revues.org/138 interestingly, French was used as a lingua franca for communication between different groups within the Ottoman Empire, but when the modern Turkish state was founded there was no longer a need for French (since most people in the new state spoke Turkish).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dinnamarca

Thanks!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dinnamarca

In Greek it is pronounced like Banyo (Μπάνιο) too!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamingOdelia
DreamingOdelia
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Do you think it would be possible to trace which language first had each word and which language 'borrowed' that word? Then follow how that word came to be part of other languages?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dinnamarca

Well,let me asure you that all these Turkish words in Greek were borrowed during the Ottoman Empire Era,when Greece used to be part of it.About the others,I really do not know who borrowed from whom,but I think that Spanish lent the above-mentioned words to Turkish,

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackyDW
JackyDW
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The amount of linguistic diffusion between the Indo-European languages and the Turkic languages is far greater than you'd think, both direct and indirect. It has given and taken words in Spanish through Arabic (Muslims occupied Spain for a very long time), and empires like the British empire had great cultural influence in the region. Some words come directly from other languages, like banyo and baño, while other words have changed meanings, like garson (waiter), which comes from the French word garçon (boy). Many Turkic words have also been lent to Hungarian, Russian, and Ancient Greek, the latter two of which have passed on these words to numerous other languages. On top of that, it shares many linguistic features with Mongolian, Korean, and Japanese, to the extent that they are hypothesized to be part of the same language family (the Altaic family, although this theory is rather unpopular nowadays).

It's because of this that I think that Turkish is the trunk of the tree of modern language. It unifies the grammar of many languages and the vocabulary of many others across huge continents and long eras.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I would think that if Turkish was the trunk of the language tree all or most other languages would have the SOV format.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackyDW
JackyDW
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Actually, there are more SOV languages than SVO languages. It's just that the Indo-European SVO languages are known more.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Probably have more speakers too. And they just happen to be my languages.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I have been told that all Spanish words containing "al" and/or an "h" between vowels come from Arabic: almohada, alcohol, albóndiga, alharaca and alcalde, among many others.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I was also surprised to find Turkish words borrowed from Spanish. I am also amused by Turkish words that have similar or identical words in Spanish, yet with very different meanings indicating a mere coincidence of letter combinations. For instance, "hasta" and "sandalye", and Turkish names that sound quite funny in Spanish such as Rabia and Riza, but especially Rabia.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HomesickTourist

Hi!

Both baño and lavabo are latin words. There are also arabic words existing in both languages. Like aceituna and zeytin (arabic. az-zaytūn) or naranja and narenciye (arabic. nāranj).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Certainly the Arabic word for orange did not make it to Turkish. I wonder from where portakal came.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HomesickTourist

Narenciye is not same with Portakal. Narenciye is a more general word includes mandarin grapefruit...extc. In Spanish it's not just orange as well they call bitter orange naranja as well. In arabic I have no idea if narenciye is just orange or whole family. But portakal word involved in Turkish of course from Portugal. They were selling oranges...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Really? I had no idea.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/last_hndn

And La Mesa(Spanish)=Masa(Turkish) . Almost :) If you are interested in Turkish vs. French, here a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcoBTLpeG4c

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SedatKlc

there are funny video about french loanwords in turkish here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZ2eXpkpxoc

1 year ago