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https://www.duolingo.com/divyenduz

Cyrillic alphabet first ?

What would you advise, learning Russian phonetic first OR cyrillic alphabet first OR both in parallel ?. Interested in knowing ways used by others learning Russian here.

2 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Skylar_Siviriko
Skylar_Siviriko
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Definitely Cyrillic alphabet first, you'll learn the language better and potentially faster too because you won't be depending on that Latin alphabet crutch.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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I agree with this. Languages that use a specific script is best learnt in that script. I can pick up quite a bit of Greek easily just because I know the alphebet, but Arabic is harder for me since I need to rely on transliterations, which slows the learning process. Russian and the Cyrillic script are no different.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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Cyrillic all the way. Honestly, unless you really don't much care about the language and have zero desire to be even a little literate in it, I recommend ditching phonetics and diving into Cyrillic from the get go.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divyenduz

How do you recommend one should go about learning cyrillic alphabet from english background ? I do not think duo lingo has a specific section for it ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flootzavut
flootzavutPlus
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The first few lessons (I think the first skill?) is the contributors' attempt to teach the alphabet, it's not ideal - Duolingo doesn't really provide a good way of learning the alphabet.

I'd suggest looking up courses on Memrise, and I'd also highly recommend learning to write it by hand as well. In my experience, nothing gets an alphabet in my head better than actually writing it by hand.

Write English words in Russian letters, write names in Russian, use it use it use it. The only way to really get a hold of it is to use it as much as possible.

I used to just copy Russian text out in my own handwriting, read it out loud, basically anything that would force me to use the alphabet in some way. I think that Memrise and similar are really good for recognition, but IMO, to get it really fixed in your memory, nothing replaces just using it as much as possible.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Avtor32

Memorize this song: https://youtu.be/GIKX9RYOX5w and then practice writing the alphabet down until your comfortable with it, and use flashcards from TinyCards or Memrise.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Almost posted that myself :) I don't know that it's the absolute first step. It probably makes sense as a second-ish one after you've at least got a look at the letters somewhere. But the rhythm does constitute quite the useful mnemonic in and of itself!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bookrabbit
bookrabbit
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I thought the Ukrainian course did a good job of teaching it. At least I was able to go on and complete the course in ten days without ever trying Cyrillic before. The Russian course is more difficult as it covers more, but was probably not quite as good at teaching the Cyrillic letters at first.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/professortall007
professortall007
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Is the ukrainian cyrillic the same as the russian? Could I use that because i need a crash course for Russian alphabet. Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bookrabbit
bookrabbit
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They have a few extra letters but otherwise it is the same, although the pronunciation might differ a bit too. It would at least be extra practice.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tattamin
Tattamin
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I'd start here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EirieV

Personally, I think it will be easier for you in the future if you learn Cyrillic from the beginning and get used to it instead of depending too much on the Latin alphabet, especially if you don't have much trouble learning Cyrillic. But I guess it depends on how you feel about learning it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/divyenduz

I think I would be comfortable to learn it first but I need a means. I do not think duo lingo has a dedicated means to just learn cyrillic alphabet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AislaWoWonder

As a Russian I say actually learn the alphabet. Helps you "understand" the launguage.

Удачи!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thunderstorm1324

Please use Cyrillic first! I found that using the keyboard was tricky without the knowledge about what the Cyrillic keyboard looked like, so I used this website to learn the letter placement. http://www.sense-lang.org/typing/tutor/keyboardingRU.php

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ExalGarcia

I think learning the cyrillic alphabet and its transliteration is a must to begin

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Cyrillic. For all the reasons everyone has stated. But if for no other reason than that Duo's transliteration system seems to be incorrigibly wacky and will reject completely correct answers given in transliteration. [one of my sometime pet projects is figuring it out: I have spent more hours on this than it will likely take you to learn the Cyrillic alphabet and still haven't succeeded; learn the alphabet! :) ]

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Unexplorer
Unexplorer
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Absolutely learn the letters first.

I have run through the letters skill level multiple times, and space the run throughs over multiple days, so that the letters really have time to sink in. In fact, I did the whole thing every morning, and then in the evening.

If you can use an onscreen keyboard with a mouse on whatever desktop computer you learn on, or the onscreen Russian/Cyrillic keyboard on a touchscreen, you'll even learn the key placement to where touch typing starts to make sense, even without the letters labeled on the physical keyboard.

Once you've spent a week running through all the lessons and the review on each day (not just one section, but the whole thing), then any additional website or resource you use will confirm what you've already internalized. At that point, you can probably even start learning to write in Cyrillic cursive while learning the letter order at the same time.

I promise, a week of diligent work will get you there.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elguy0

It's better to go with the Cyrillic script from scratch. And if you are serious about learning the language you should begin directly with the alphabet from day 1. If you aren't able to touch type, maybe it's the opportunity to learn this, too. From a linguistic point of view, using a transliteration script may be interesting or even advisable if the language's writing system isn't alphabetical, like Japanese. You can learn a lot, while concentrating just in talking and even be successful in conversation without knowing anything about the script. I don't recommend it, but it makes sense when writing a script is as difficult as the Japanese one and you are mostly interested (or just interested) in conversation. Instead, for alphabetical scripts, the few hours devoted to this specific task, are negligible compared to the advantages and the hundreds or thousands of hours that you will invest in the language and the culture you are targeting.

1 year ago