"הוא מוצא עניין בה."

Translation:He finds interest in her.

August 27, 2016

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/SarahHagai

It seems like a literal translation of the English sentence. Is it really how it's said in Hebrew ?

August 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

It's kind of OK Hebrew. This is an expression that exists, but the order of the words is grating. It would be more natural to say "הוא מוצא בה עניין".

That said, I would use "he is interested in her" for the English translation.

March 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlmogL

I don't think I would ever say it this way, but one could say הוא מוצא בה עניין. It could be an influence of English though. There is also הוא מתעניין בה.

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahHagai

Thank you!

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rBhr5

This is odd, stilted English. I'd go so far as to say it's incorrect English. Firstly, I take it that בה could either be 'her' or 'it' if 'it' was a feminine object. (I may be wrong about this.) But secondly and more importantly, in English we don't usually say we 'find' an interest in something; instead, we 'take' or 'have' an interest in something. And thirdly and even more importantly, 'interest' in this context is usually preceded by the indefinite article 'an'. So 'He takes/has an interest in her/it' should be accepted. The inclusion of 'an' before 'interest' is essential. Mind you, the more natural way to say 'He has an interest in her' in English would be 'He finds her interesting.' The English sentence 'He takes an interest in her' has a slightly different meaning but should still be correct. (Reported.)

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

First of all, בה is neither 'her' nor 'it'. It is either 'in her' or 'in it'.

As for English, you mentioned that people do use the verb 'to find' to mean 'to perceive', as in "I find your reasoning logical" or "I find this discussion interesting". It's easy to get from this to me finding interest in this discussion. I also disagree about the indefinite article. You don't use the indefinite article before a mass noun like water. So why is 'interest' like that? Well, can you find (or have) two interests in this discussion? I don't think so, which means that interest in this sense is uncountable.

A quick google search for "find interest in" yields hundreds of thousands of results, for example: https://www.quora.com/How-can-I-find-interest-in-any-field-of-study-if-I-dont-know-in-which-field-I-have-interest

https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/football/premier-league/garth-crooks-struggles-to-find-interest-in-a-day-spent-watching-football-10031017.html

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rBhr5

I do realise that בה actually means ‘in her’ or ‘in it’; apologies for my typo.

Yes, you can use 'find' with 'water' and many other concrete as well as abstract nouns in English. But in general, you 'find an interest, 'have an interest, or 'take an interest' in something or someone. The example you cited from Quora doesn't sound very natural either, and it's not commonly used this way. It's just not idiomatically used that way usually.

In any case, in the example used here, 'He finds interest in her' simply doesn't sound natural at all in English. It's not English as it's actually used and spoken so it's really not correct. If you’re a native English speaker, would you ever actually say or write it that way?

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

English is used in many different ways by many different native English speakers around the world. The title writer for the Independent used it like this:

Garth Crooks struggles to find interest in a day spent watching football

July 7, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Janis559500

Did you mean to type "Garth Brooks" (one of my favorite country & western singers)? I actually have a dear old friend named Crooks, but both Crooks and Garth are rare names, so I'm guessing the article says C&W artists prefer music to football. Back to the subject, "find interest in" is acceptable, but a less common usage than "to find __ interesting" IMHO.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

No, Garth Crooks. A former English soccer player. From the second link I posted.

July 8, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan892482

This is a very strange sentence.

June 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MrsT637020

Very strange. What does it mean? That English sentence had no meaning. "He finds interest in her"???

November 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

Perhaps a better translation would be "he finds her interesting".

The Hebrew is an expression, one of several expressions about how things or people are perceived. All of them use the verb מצא and add a noun describing the perception:

מצא עניין - find something/someone interesting

מצא חן - find something/someone to be nice or attractive - to like

November 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mitchell234377

Poor English translation

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

Sure, but English is not the point here. It's about teaching Hebrew, and staying as close as possible to the Hebrew is a good thing as long as the English is still understandable.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan892482

Yes they are teaching Hebrew but it's not clear that the Hebrew they are teaching is correct. I think הוא מוצא בה ענין sounds more like the Hebrew I've heard.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

Might be more common, but Hebrew is far more lenient than English about word order - it's difficult to translate Yoda-speak.

הוא מוצא בה עניין

הוא מוצא עניין בה

בה הוא מוצא עניין

עניין הוא מוצא בה

הוא בה מוצא עניין

מוצא עניין הוא בה

All of these are grammatical and they differ by nothing except emphasis.

January 17, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Allan892482

Touche, though I prefer my emphasis

January 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AJ1Tee

He doesn't "find" interest, he "has" interest!

March 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/synp

He finds her interesting.

March 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Janis559500

I put "he finds her interesting" and it was marked correct.

July 1, 2018
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