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  5. "לחנוכייה יש תשעה נרות."

"לחנוכייה יש תשעה נרות."

Translation:The Chanukiya has nine candles.

August 29, 2016

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben-Nissim

The word Chanukiah was not used until fairly recently. It was invented by Hemda Ben Yehuda towards the end of the 19th century. So all of you who say 'menorah' is not the correct word in English, or any other language, for the "chanukiah," what did people call it before she invented the word "chanukiah?" Probably - menorah. (I saw on wikipedia that it's called Hanukah Lamp in Yiddish.) Maybe if there was some confusion they would add the word Hanukah to distinguish it from the Menorah in the Beit HaMikdash. But that probably only occured among Torah scholars when discussing ... The Hanukah menorah is a memorial for the Menorah in the Beit Hamikdash. That is where the tahor oil was lit after the war with the Greeks and the recovery of the Beit Hamikdash. Menorah can be translated as lamp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qbeast

The word chanukiya does not appear in my (rather old) Merriam-Webster Unabridged Dictionary, the Merriam-Webster online dictionary, my Random House Dictionary, or my Oxford English Dictionary. However, menorah is listed in all four sources, with each source giving at least one of the possible definitions as a Chanukah lamp. (The OED does this by giving a usage example.) Yes, I know that מנורה means something else in Hebrew, but the Chanukah lamp is most commonly called a menorah in English. I am sorry that some people are uncomfortable about this meaning of the English word menorah in relation to the meaning of its Hebrew cognate, but when asked to translate something into English, we should do so. Phrases like משלוח מנות do need to be transcribed into Roman letters because they have no reasonable English equivalent. But the word חנוכייה does have a direct English equivalent, and that equivalent word is menorah.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elana1818

Absolutely correct and well-said. Have a lingot, qbeast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnCatDubh

It’s always baffled me how Anglophones call the khanukiyá a ‘menorah’. The Menorá had 7 candle holders and was used in the Temple of Israel; it is radically different.

EDIT: Apparently in some edót they call it מְנוֹרַת חֲנֻכָּה, so it makes more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

The HEBREW word מנורה refers to a lamp, and particularly to the one in the Temple. The ENGLISH word "menorah" means a Hannukah lamp, with a secondary meaning of Temple lamp. The word that Anglophones use for something is, by definition, the correct translation of that thing into English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berenyu

The word Menora just means lamp. It isn't exclusive to the Beit Hamikdash at all. It's used in numerous instances in Mishna and Talmud in referring to lamps in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

Correct, for that exact reason we chose the transliterated word over the "Americanized" version. Same goes to "Synagogue/Bet-Knesset" and "Temple".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Ah, but you accept "synagogue," while you do not accept "menorah." The US English word for a חנוכייה, used by all the American Jews I know, of whatever level of religiosity, is menorah.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

It doesn't make it correct. Menorah refers to the Temple Menorah, that's a totally different thing. Just like parts of American Jewry will refer to synagogues as "temples" (because a synagogue is מקדש מעט), but no one else in the world will call it that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Well, that simply raises the question of what "correct" means in regard to a language. In a language that recognizes a central authority, such as Metropolitan French with the Académie Française, one can say it is correct, if accepted by that authority. English has no such authority, so of it is accepted by a large number if people for communication in English, it is correct, at least in that group.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

I don't think it matters, it's not a linguistic question, but a religious one. It refers to a different artifact in our religion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

That is a tricky issue, isn't it. I would certainly accept that it is incorrect in some particular branch of Judaism, but as long as I still hear lots of American Jews referring to it as that, I would say it is correct in American English. This is not uncommon, of course. I would, for instance, compare it to the use of the honorific "reverend." In my denomination of Christianity, it is only ever used with another title (Reverend Mr, Reverend Dr, Reverend Fr), and I was certainly raised to think of referring to someone as "Reverend Jones," for instance, absolutely incorrect. I do, however, hear many other Americans use the title that way, so I would have to say it is not incorrect in US English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dovbear57

Good point, please accept this lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berenyu

I've only used the word synagogue if talking to someone who wouldn't be likely to know the word shul. I believe this applies to most of us in America. The word synagogue is not widely used among jews.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akiva2
  • 1859

But you also need to accept the full range of variant spellings. Eg. Hannukiah....probably the most common on UK English. PS....no-one here calls it a menorah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Do gentiles also call it a hannukiah in the UK?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

If you are really interested, I would suggest looking at what the speakers of Yiddish called it two centuries ago (or far less likely speakers of Ladino three centuries ago). That would have been what Jewish immigrants to the United States called it. Since the number of US Jews was vastly more than that of UK ones, I would suspect that their terms became accepted in Jewish English around the world. It's also the reason why I think of the holidays, greetings, etc. in their Yiddish pronunciations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

James, apparently they called it a menorah, chanukiya was introduced into modern Hebrew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Akiva2
  • 1859

The transliteration of chanukiah is not consistent across examples. This needs to be amended so that all variants are accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hava_Dorit

And, for that matter, the transliteration of Hanukkah is not consistent either. The variants I can think of offhand are: Chanukah, Channukah, Chanukkah, Hanukkah, Hanukah. There may be more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben-Nissim

Aside from what everyone is saying here no one mentioned the fact the the Chanukiah or the Menorah or the Lamp for Chanuka has only eight canndles. The shamesh is not part of the Chanu-Menor-Lamp


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allan892482

On a "lighter" (no pun intended) note, you can walk into a store in Israel and ask for a מנורה and they will sell you a light bulb. I'm always happy to find words from my religious training useful in modern Israel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Very simple, I wrote the Hanukkah menorah... AND it wasn't accepted. ?!?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roderickbl

I think it wants a, not the. Which I think is silly, ingress I am misunderstanding the Hebrew


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allan892482

And they marked me wrong because I didn't capitalize Chanukiah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

No, that can never be the case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greg38424

It was probably your spelling; theirs appears to be "chanukiya"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Greg, chanukiyah is the Hanukkah menorah in Hebrew ...It's not the same thing as "Chanukah". See above comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miashe

I think duolingo should put more options for these kind of cases, because it is not right to say that the answers like chanukkah menora or similar are wrong. And even more because the underlined word offers this answer, whoch then turns out to be the wrong one..ah, well..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BG8aa

the chanukia has eight candles and a "helper candle" שמש -- not 9

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