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  5. "η Ιλιάδα"

"η Ιλιάδα"

Translation:The Iliad

August 30, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tedhascoldpants

So what's the difference between το and η? Gender? Euphony? Something else?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 229

Yes, it's gender. There are three in Greek. Masculine, feminine and neutral. The gender of the word usually has no relation to whether it refers to a man, woman or door. A girl e.g. is neuter. :-0


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summer.Breeze

In the German language as you most definitely already know, girl is also neuter. lol


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

"Girl" is neuter in German because it has the diminutive ending, and diminutive words are neuter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

The same goes for το κορίτσι, η μικρή κόρη/ the small daughter ot kore


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_Lauren

This mention of Homer makes me wonder if this is course is covering ancient Greek or modern? The μπαμπας (-σ?) I previously encountered suggests modern. Having taken four semesters of ancient Greek (classics major!), I must admit I know very little about modern Greek (though I had a prof who said things were pretty different!), so I'm hoping this IS modern!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod
  • 138

The course teaches Modern Greek! Happy learning!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 229

The Tips & Notes for the first Skill begins with: "Modern Greek" further on Modern Greek is stated again twice. There is also a great deal of other relevant information and links to resources etc. Each skill has such a section...see top left...Tips & notes. Whatever other information you need please feel free to ask.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Revenitor

DEFINITELY modern. (Attic for "Iliad" was more like "Ilias".) However, it appears to have a good bit that may relate to Ancient Greek, and it's still part of their culture.

P.S.: Some of the differences include the tendency for many stops to become fricatives, (including all formerly aspirated ones) the elimination of rough breathing, (word-initial [h] sound) the merging of vowel phonemes, the changes of many diphthongs, the elimination of pitch accent, major changes to inflection, and I believe the introduction of articles. I don't think Ancient had any, kind of like Latin.

I like Ancient more, but I think this is kinda cool. I hope that helped you some. Wikipedia has alot on the matter if you'd like to study it. Enjoy learning Modern Greek!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/slh123

I know this isn't an ancient Greek course, but since many students of modern Greek have had some Ancient Greek, I want to correct one error in your post. Unlike in Latin (whose lack of definite article is sometimes annoying), Ancient Greek DID in fact use definite articles (and sometimes in wonderful ways I might add). Thankfully, most of them are still the same or at least similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan681909

I am a begginer at duolingo, and was wondering how you write in greek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 229

Here you are. These links will not only show you how to get the Greek keyboard but also how to find the Greek letters on it.

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/22040507

It will also help you learn the alphabet and where to find other useful links.

And here is another to help you navigate Duolingo

FAQ - General Questions, Bugs & Reports

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/23799672

Some simple rules to get you started:

1st rule of Duolingo: read the comments before posting.

2nd rule; read the Tips & notes on the page with the lessons

3.rd rule use: the hover drop down hints....move your cursor over a word and the meaning will appear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RCRX79

Are all proper nouns considered feminine? Why is it so in the case of "Iliad"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Are all proper nouns considered feminine?

No.

Why is it so in the case of "Iliad"?

You can tell it's a feminine noun because it ends in -α.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_Greek_grammar#Declensions


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod
  • 138

Plenty of neuter nouns end in -α too, -μα specifically: πρόβλημα (problem), θεώρημα (theorem), ανάθεμα (anathema)... See here http://www.foundalis.com/lan/grknouns.htm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2363

Connecting some dots for multi-language learners:

If a Spanish noun ends in -ma and is masculine, it probably comes from Greek.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RCRX79

Thank you everyone!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Nouns ending in -α not -μα are feminine

Nouns ending in -μα are neuter. They end in -m if borrowed into English: theorem/ θεώρημα, paradigm/ παράδιγμα, problem/ πρόβλημα

Exception το γάλα


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod
  • 138

Nouns ending in -μα are neuter.

Not all of them. Some, like μαμά, νοσοκόμα are feminine. ;)
To be fair, I can't think of any more (apart from the foreign Χιροσίμα!) so maybe they are some sort of exception.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirakrakra

Thank you. I should have guessed that there are exceptions

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