1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. Italian Resource - Free Gramm…

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Italian Resource - Free Grammar Books

Here are 2 free Italian Grammar e-Books.

The intermediate/Advanced book is very thorough, it has 67 pages just on prepositions.

These can be downloaded as a PDF, Plain Text, DAISY, ePub, and Kindle file.

September 1, 2016

23 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

Great! I've never seen an Italian grammar so detailed! Questionable only the long introduction about the variation of pronunciation according to the parts/region of Italy, in particular very often a "regional" variation is simply a regional dialectal form. "Dangerous" also many "used" words: if it's true that a local policeman can be called among friends "cerino" in Trieste, "ghisa" in Milan and "pizzardone" in Rome, I I'm sure that is better not to say to a policeman, "Excuse me, Mr. pizzardone.... . The same for certain expression used only by - to be good - "bumpkins. But all together a precious book! Thank you, "rafforza"

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckendall19

I go to Milan a lot and ghisa is widely used as cop would be used in the US. I would not ask Mr. Cop for some directions but in talking to the taxi driver I would note the presence of the ghisa in the intersection ahead.

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

Surely, but I was not speaking about taxi drivers, I was saying that certain mentioned terms must be used where they can be used, that is not everywhere. (By the way "ghisa" is cast iron, which is the grey,foggy colour (Milan is famous for its fog) of their uniforms)

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Yeah, very good point. The intro actually has a little section dedicated to registers, which they label as R1*-R3. Ghisa, celerino, and pizzardone are all R1 - (only used in very informal situations.)

For the formal "R3" they list only "polizia" and "pubblicca sicurezza". Even "poliziotto" and "guardia" fall short of R3 according to the authors.

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

Let me go deeper on what I said. 1.4: Dialect and Italian in contact : The Elsa Morante's "conversation" (that should be an example of "contact") is an unreal jumble of dialect (not always correctly reported: e.g., in Venice they say "tàsi", not "tàse") and language. I can not imagine who can say that. 1.5: Register : About R1 I read, incredulous: "We make no apology for including these terms, as they are among the most frequent in colloquial Italian and they must be understood". I wonder which kind of people the authors are using to meet: dockers? Whorehouse regular customers? Personally, when I hear these terms I say simply that I don't use them (and I am not a monk) and I invite my interlocutor to do the same. Normally, he apologises. The "Pubblica (one "c") Sicurezza" is one of the components of the "forze di polizia" (Polizia di Stato, Carabinieri, Guardia di Finanza, Polizia penitenziaria, etc.), "Poliziotto" is used instead of "agente", which is more appropriate, "guardia" can have different meanings.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Grazie Berto, I appreicate the insights. I agree, it seems the goal of the authors is not just to outline grammatically prescribed constructions but to almost make an anthropological linguistic survey of how the language is used as a whole across the country. What's not entirely clear to me is exactly how R1 - R3 relate to verb conjugations, if they even do. It seems that if R1 includes dialectically infused and ungrammatical Italian, R2 is used for casual forms of grammatically prescribed Italian, and that that might be the difference. Thanks again, cheers

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Berto29441

You are perfectly right. It's a strange text, with a quantity of useful information and (perhaps) an equal quantity of useless specifications. For the verbs: R2 or R3, both have the same conjugation. I think (but I’m not sure) the authors would say that some of them have not only the “normal” meaning but a special one (take “amalgamare” = mix, merge together, and prepare a mercury + metal alloy). Of course I gave only a glance, but in the “modal verbs” (potere, dovere, volere) they made difficult a very easy rule: the three verbs take the auxiliary of the verb following the modal: “Io ho dovuto/voluto/potuto mangiare” (because I have to say “io ho mangiato”); “io sono dovuto/voluto/ potuto andare” (because “io sono andato”). Thank to you, "Rafforza"

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nur2120

Thanks a lot!!

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nena5000

Thank you, rafforza, for posting it. It looks very interesting and I look forward to reading it in detail.

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hackneyduo

Looks good: just one concern, are the webpages safe?

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

Yes, they're 100% safe. I used bitly to shorten the urls, because otherwise they're quite long.

Both of these come from archive.org which is associated with various museums, universities, and institutional libraries.

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hackneyduo

OK. Thanks a lot!

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/evanhien

Thank you! This will be very useful...

September 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carmen1038

Great resource. Thanks for uploading this!

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BlueSpring4

Grazie!

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiorgioYianni

Grazie tante!

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/caramba6

Thank you!)

September 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maralujan

thanks a lot!

February 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DoloresDay

Hi there :) I am looking for a good grammar book which is why I ended up here. The link for the advanced book is no longer available. Do you perhaps remember the title and the author so I can try finding it elsewhere? Many thanks!

December 16, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick340860

Thank you very much for sharing these. I look forward to using them as I learn Italian.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zey.s

Thank you so much!

February 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hunter667945

How do I download the beginner version?? I can open it but I can't see the option to download it.

April 13, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntauLJn

There's a box with rounded corners at the top (above the right corner of the book), with an arrow pointing down, that says, "PDF/ePub". Click on that and a popup gives you the option to download it as a PDF, ePub, plain text, DAISY, or Kindle.

September 19, 2019
Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.