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  5. "Αυτή πίνει το γάλα της."

"Αυτή πίνει το γάλα της."

Translation:She drinks her milk.

September 1, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

Is this like the si/sin/sitt/sia etc. reflexive pronoun of the other Indo-European languages, or is this a different "her", or does Greek have the same problem English does?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panagiotis_ts

I'm not sure that I've understood well your question, but I'll try to answer to it.

I see that you are level 13 in Swedish, so I suppose that you mean the Swedish possession pronouns "sin", "sitt" and "sina", which mean "his", "her", "its" or "their" (depending on the context) and they are used to show that something belongs to the subject of the sentence. For example, "Han dricker sin vatten" = He drinks his water (the water is his) and "Han dricker hans vatten" = He drinks his water (the water isn't his).

In Greek there is not anything similar. "Αυτή πίνει το γάλα της" (= She drinks her milk) doesn't clarify if the milk that she drinks is hers or belongs to somebody else.

I hope that this helps. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

Ευχαριστώ! That helped me too (I could relate to the Swedish example- in Norwegian it works the same way). I guess Greek has the same potential ambiguity that English does when it comes to possessives. ...BTW, as you said, this is not related to Greek, but I am not sure what Zerr is referring to when he/she says "French and Italian also have it"- as far as I know they do not. That is to say, those languages can indeed express that idea, but not with a different word, rather with an additional one (like English "own"), e.g. (English) She drinks her own milk= (French) Elle boit son propre lait.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tsikriteas

You should edit your reply to "Han dricker sitt vatten". Not 'sin vatten'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 271

Did you really want this comment here? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tsikriteas

Yes, I'll remove it once the comment by 'panagiotis_ts ' has been edited. I know this isn't the Swedish comment section, but his comment is still wrong gramatically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 271

I see I hope panagiotis_ts sees it soon and edits or removes their comment. Thanks for your assistance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

Okay, thanks! Esperanto, French, and Italian also have it, as I'd guess also do most Indo-European languages do, but I guess Greek is a bit weird, too.

Thanks again!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomyTomaso

In Italian the possessive "mio/mia" would keep the ambiguity. To clarify that the owner is the same as the subject, we would use the adjective "proprio/propria". Example: "Lei beve is suo latte" = "She drinks her milk". {It could that the milk belongs to her, or to someone else.} "Lei beve il proprio latte" = "She drinks her own milk". And because languages are fun, I'd like to add that in Italian the gender of the possesive refers to the object possessed, not the subject. So, the Italian sentence "Lei beve il suo latte" could also mean "She drinks his milk". And now back to Greek :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panagiotis_ts

It is not related to Greek, but I am just curious. How do you express such a thing in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/awefulwaffle

In French, you would normally know who the owner/possessor is from the context. To avoid ambiguity, you can add "... à lui" "...à elle"

  • Elle boit son lait = She drinks his/her milk
  • Elle boit son lait à lui = She drinks his milk
  • Elle boit son lait à elle = She drinks her milk

In English, the possessive pronouns (e.g. his, her) agree in with the gender of the possessor of the object (e.g. the person who owns the milk - her milk, his milk).

In French, the possessive pronouns (e.g. sa, son, ses) agree in number and gender with the person or thing that is possessed. The possessive pronoun is not influenced by the gender of the person who is the possessor. (e.g. his milk, her milk = son lait)

source: A Complete French Grammar for Reference and Practice, p. 346, Trudy Marie Booth


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

"Elle boit son lait", I believe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/panagiotis_ts

This doesn't clarify is she drinks her own milk, or somebody else's milk. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zerr_

Ah, okay. It appears I was mistaken. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

In German you can avoid this ambiguity by choosing a different possessive pronoun.

She drinks her milk. --> Sie trinkt ihre Milch. (her own milk or someone else's milk --> ambiguous)

Sie trinkt dessen Milch. (a male person's milk) Sie trinkt deren Milch. (a female person's milk)

The last two are disambiguous, but they are hardly used in spoken language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

I second Zerr's question- I was wondering exactly the same thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reissecup

I keep thinking γαλα means apple for some reason


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wchargin

Perhaps you're thinking of Gala apples? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipduerdoth

Or Milo made with milk? :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/furrykef

Think of "galaxy" instead, as in the Milky Way. (This is in fact where the word "galaxy" comes from!)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reissecup

oh damn really? that's cool


[deactivated user]

    I have a problem with the spoken sentences because the voice only says the first few words ... e.g. 'Αυτή πίνει το' and I have to click on it again to make it say the whole sentence e.g. 'Αυτή πίνει το γάλα της'. Does anyone else have this problem?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

    The audio sounds ok in this exercise. Such issues might occur sometimes. At least that's what happens to me in the Duolingo App sometimes. Have you been using it?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyazko

    I said "This one is drinking her milk." and was marked wrong. How would I say this?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipduerdoth

    Simply: She is drinking her milk.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lyazko

    Thanks for your response. You responded in English, however, and I was asking for a Greek response.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philipduerdoth

    Ah, in that case I think you must be asking how to say in Greek: this one


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

    It's the same sentence, I've added it

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