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  5. "Έχει πολλή κίνηση."

"Έχει πολλή κίνηση."

Translation:There is a lot of traffic.

September 1, 2016

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

Should "there is" not be υπάρχει not έχει?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

In colloquial Greek "έχει" would be used but, of course, "υπάρχει" is correct and more formal. I'm afraid the Greek cannot be changed at this point in the course. "Υπάρχει" is one of the possible translations in the English to Greek sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AneurinEE

Ah thanks - I didn't know that about έχει.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Could this also be "It (e.g. this area) has a lot of traffic" or would that require a pronoun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

Yes, it could be. Thanks for catching that. I'm adding it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Guillaume167779

is "εχει" generally colloquially used instead of "υπαρχει"? Or just in a few cases like this one? Can you give a little guidance on when each might be used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

Yes, "έχει" is by far more common than 'υπάρχει". Of course, the most common word in Greek is "είναι".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xapns

Πολλή vs. Πολύ; what's the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fien.branson

Πολύ is an adverb, 'very'. With dubble λ you have an adjective. The ending agrees with the noun's gender and case (and plural-singular). In this case: πολλή.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/D_..
Mod
  • 27

Note that the adjective is πολύς-πολλή-πολύ, so the double λ is not a fail-safe indication of what part of the speech you're looking at. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rob183829

I think you should accept " It has lots of traffic"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

Yes, thank you, it has been added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesphealy

"There is heavy traffic" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

Thank you it has been added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robert672165

yes, but you didn't allow "much" as correct even though you give it as a hint. do you allow misleading hints?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

The hints are not there to mislead or trick you they are there as hints not the answers. Just as a dictionary may have a variety of definitions for a word, not all those definitions are correct in all sentences. "Πολλή" can mean either "a lot (of), or much or many etc that doesn't mean each of these is correct in every situation. Specifically, in this case, we wouldn't use "much" because "much and many" are used in questions and negative sentences. If you really want a hint...it's usually the first word that will be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CostaDax

The words "much" and "many" are used only in questions and negative sentences?!?! Nothing could be further from the truth! "There's much traffic" is how a native English speaker would say "Έχει πολλή κίνηση" most of the time. I've reported it and I really hope you add it to the correct answers soon.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/spdl79
Mod
  • 1451

Hmm, I think I'd respectfully disagree with you there. At least in my experience - I'm an Irish-Australian-Briton, and an editor to boot - I've never come across "much" being used in this way. To me, something like "there is much traffic on the highway today" sounds, if anything, really archaic and stilted.

To be fair perhaps younger people are starting to use it that way, or perhaps in North America or other parts of the Anglosphere, it does get used that way. But I think it's uncommon enough to leave out as one of the accepted translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaWard7

Yes, why is "much traffic" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

This has been answered multiple times on this page. Please read the comments above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaWard7

Thank you. For some reason, the last few posts didn't load when I first read the discussion.

Now, I agree that it is more common in spoken language to hear "a lot of," but in writing, especially formal writing, "much" is indeed used. If I may use Jane Austen's still very popular Pride and Prejudice as an example: “She was therefore obliged to seek another branch of the subject, and related, with much bitterness of spirit and some exaggeration, the shocking rudeness of Mr. Darcy.”

A more modern example would be the following heading from an 2018 article in the Culture Chronicles: "Last week there was much speculation as to what Mueller had up his sleeve. But Trump may have few surprises in store as well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 292

Thank you for the comment and the quotes have given us reason to rethink our sentence. Depending on context our sentence could be seen in a more formal light.

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