"To go for a walk"

Translation:Mynd am dro

September 2, 2016

7 Comments


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This is an idiom and means literally 'go for a turn'. Universal throughout Wales, although one variation is 'Mynd am 'wak" (from walk of course)

Not to be confused with 'cerdded' which means 'to walk'

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

I deleted my initial comment as I looked it up and found my answer but thank you for your reply, it certainly gives more insight!

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

Curiously, this idiom has the same literal meaning of its equivalent in Italian, so it's very easy for me to memorize it.

September 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

That's interesting! what is the idiom in Italian go like? does the Italian idiom have it's roots in Latin?

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

The Italian idiom is andare a fare un giro, which can translate as 'to go and make a turn'.

Giro translates in many ways, according to the context:

  • a turn, a twist, a coil, or its direction (i.e. clockwise/anticlockwise);

  • a complete 360 degree revolution, a circumference;

  • a lap (of a circuit, of a race);

  • a short tour;

and a few more idiomatic meanings.

A parallel expression is andare a fare una passeggiata, but this specifically refers to go for a stroll on foot.

Instead andare a fare un giro is more generic, it can be either on foot, or by bike, by car, etc. And it does not necessarily imply returning to the starting point, so it's more like 'going around'.

There is no such idiom in Latin, as far as I know, but the word giro does come from Latin gyrus (a geometric circle or its circumference, a circular movement, a circuit or a lap around the circuit, a coil).

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ash473779

Thank you for such a good quality answer! It's interesting how the Italian and welsh both more or less use the same expression, it's probably through coincidence, although I initially asked if it was from Latin because I know Latin did have some influence on early welsh due to Roman occupation, as well as Latin and the Celtic languages possibly having some similarities because of a hypothesised "Italo-Celtic" branch of the Indo-European family tree.

September 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CivisRomanus

I too think that this idiom is just a coincidence (a curious one, though). But in order to memorize new Welsh words, I try to find connections with words I already know, and sometimes I do find more similarities with Italian ones (of Latin origin) than with English ones, especially terms with a basic meaning.
Ysgrifenni is indeed closer to scrivere than to write, and gwyrdd is phonetically more similar to verde than to green, just to mention two. There are cases in which there is similarity with Latin, such as dysgu and discere, but not with Italian. This is no coincidence, and clearly confirms the Latin influence.

In a few cases, the influence is somewhat concealed. Not many would guess that tymor has to do with Latin tempus. But if you compare the plural form tymhorau (which still retains the old 'h') with the inflected forms of the Latin word, e.g. ablative tempore, the phonetic similarity is much more evident.

September 4, 2016
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