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  5. "Η πίτσα έχει σκόρδο."

"Η πίτσα έχει σκόρδο."

Translation:The pizza has garlic.

September 2, 2016

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 1828

Does σκόρδο have multiple possible pronunciations? Course voice does not sound like 'skordo.' It sounds more like 'shkoriro.' Thank you for putting the course together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

I just listened a few times and I think it's the fact that she rolls the "r" that makes it almost another syllable. But actually, it is just as it's written. But it's not "sh" as in "she" "should".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ID-007
  • 1828

Jaye, Thanks for taking the time to clarify this. Enjoy the lingot, Daniel.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

Again thank you. I'm only too glad to help wherever I can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doconnor80

Τhis happens frequently throughout the course. For some reason the word is pronounced correctly in isolation when you hover over it but is mispronounced in the whole sentence. Within the phrase, this is definitely mispronounced - the voice says σκόριδο


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Dimitris_

Bad audio. Skordo is the only correct pronunciation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

Thanks Dimitris for the post we'll add this to the reports.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMEND1

What's the gender?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEMorin3

I wrote The pizza contains garlic. I feel this is a more idiomatic translation (but English is not my mother tongue). And "contains" has been accepted in similar phrases before. Not here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

Since the Greek simple says: "έχει" hasand not "περιέχει" contains and since as a native Eng. speaker I feel "contains" would be an admixture as e.g. the cake contains "eggs, flour etc". ,that is, the various parts becoming one whereas the items on a pizza are placed on top as well as the necessity to translate what we have in the original Greek I don't feel "contains" would be justified.

In doing translations for learning purposes it's always best to adhere as close to the original as possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEMorin3

Thanks for answering. I'll comment next time I choose "contains" over "has" for "έχει" and get it accepted. -- You might see the garlic as an ingredient of the tomato sauce, which makes it an admixture. -- You know that "is eating" is accepted as well as "eats" for "τρώει". The closest translation sometimes sounds strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

If you could tell us where "contains" was accepted we could see if it was correct. Each usage is done individually. And yes, we do know that the present continuous is also accepted for "τρώει" if at any time it was not please let us know so we can edit it if it needs to be edited. We tend to give the present simple as the primary translation as many of our learners are not native English speakers and would more easily understnad the basic form. However, wherever feasible we include other forms such as the present continuous. If one was neglected please understand that each sentence is added individually and errors can occur and it is with the help of the community that we can correct things.

Translations can often seem strange very seldom do we have translations that embrace every nuance of both the source and the target language. That's one reason that translations of books and other long items very often are twice as long as the original.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LEMorin3

Fine, I'll take a screenshot next time. And make a comment. -- "Twice as long as the original" seems to be a slight exaggeration. When I translate technical handbooks into Swedish, sometimes I manage to make the translator shorter than the source text. Technical writers are not always linguists, and they might use more words than necessary (especially in German).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

Yes, it's an exaggeration to generalize but I have seen one volume books published in two (fairly equal size) in another language. And as a translator, I'm aware of how often the need to paraphrase increases the length of a translation. I think we can assume that technical articles would have areas that are similar in more than one language whereas literature and philosophical books would be harder to get the idea across briefly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

There are a lot of variables that go into this based on the individual languages involved, but it is seriously off-topic and not relevant to the reason people are reading this thread.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gatu77

My answer "the pizza contains garlic" was not accepted, but sometimes it accepts "contains" in similar phrases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vmar33

Still the same : ... "σκόριδο"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 267

It is simply a rolled "R" which is correct pronunciation. Try here for a less rolled R version here

And here for other useful links: here


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeresaInse

Her pronunciation of garlic is atypical. It sounds like she's adding an extra syllable between the ro and the delta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Allan870624

I don't think many English speakers would say, "the pizza has garlic." It would be more natural to say, "There is garlic in (or on) the pizza."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErlendBron

"The pizza has garlic" is not correct English. Could someone change this please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JOrlando3

In a previous sentence, έχει offered "contains" as a translation in the hint box, but this sentence was wrong when translated as "The pizza contains garlic." Both sentences are a little awkward in English as a native speaker would actually be much more likely to say "There is garlic on the pizza" or "It is a garlic pizza."

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