"They go to my father's house."

Translation:Sie gehen zum Haus meines Vaters.

2/5/2013, 4:19:02 AM

91 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/boombaroomba

Why "nach Hause" is wrong here?

2/18/2014, 7:36:42 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ArchitOjha
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"Nach hause" usually translates to the context of going home and not house.

8/18/2014, 12:05:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDower

I was always taught that zu Hause is used when you want to say something/someone is at home

2/21/2017, 11:34:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/andrey420

Yeah, you're right. But to me 'zu Haus' sounds pretty same like 'to house' (like 'to car'). I mean they' re visiting him, not just comming close.

Not a German, so i can't say for sure.

3/6/2015, 9:28:11 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Larkspire
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Yeah, I was always under the impression that "zu Haus[e]" was very specifically going home.

3/27/2015, 7:50:48 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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Nope. Nach Hause = to home. Zu Hause = at home.

3/27/2015, 8:19:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/arnodunstatter

So then does the way this sentence is written imply that they're going to visit the speaker's father? (That he is at home?)

5/31/2018, 5:39:02 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/VaterGut

Could someone explain why it is sometimes zu Hause, whilst here it is simply Haus?

2/7/2013, 3:23:40 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jahudam

Hause is more like "home" Haus is more like "house" So you say "Ich gehe nach Hause", or "Ich gehe zu meinem Haus"

2/17/2013, 5:28:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/VaterGut

ahhh, okay.. that's useful to know. thanks!

2/17/2013, 5:48:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EugenePankov

'nach Hause' and 'zuhause' are kind of established expressions for 'home' as in direction and location

8/9/2014, 12:09:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Frau_Lynda

The 'e' ending on Haus in the expressions 'nach Hause' or 'zu Hause' or on Land in 'auf dem Lande' are remnants of when nouns in German also declined more. Other examples of this remaining are the dative plural noun, ending on certain 'der nouns' (den Jungen in accusative and dem Jungen in dative) and, of course, we see endings on nouns in the genitive. Zu Hause and nach Hause can be and often are translated as at home/going home and that helps to remember the 'e'.

2/10/2014, 4:39:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/alborghetti

What is the difference between 'meines vaters' and 'meiner vater'

12/9/2014, 7:11:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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noun meines Vaters = noun of my father (my father's noun). It is Genitive, indicating his possession.

meiner Vater = my father. It is nominative, straight up and simple.

Nominative: Meiner Vater hat eine Ente (my father has a duck)

Genitive: Das ist die Ente meines Vaters (That is the duck of my father/That is my father's duck)

12/9/2014, 7:16:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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Sorry, but meiner Vater doesn't exist, it should be "mein Vater hat eine Ente".

3/24/2016, 9:59:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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That was a year ago...but no excuses. You are correct! https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/mein That wiki looks to serve a better job.

(n) Der Vater ... / Mein Vater ...

Spot on! Prima!

3/24/2016, 10:26:23 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Cosmosis14
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Why is it "zum" and not "zu dem?" I thought you only contract the preposition and article when the noun was masculine, and not neuter, as in das Haus.

2/5/2013, 4:19:02 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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There's no such rule. "zu dem" can always be contracted.

2/5/2013, 5:10:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/capt.cacan

As long as there is a dem afterwards, you contract it with the correct prepositions... I.e. von dem=vom, zu dem=zum.

9/23/2015, 11:48:52 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/babykage

I wonder why it is "meines Vaters"...

2/11/2013, 2:35:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jahudam

That's the Genitiv case, which you learn in an upcoming lesson. It's a whole tense for possessive things. The translation "das Haus meines Vaters" is a bit more formal than "das Haus von meinem Vater" but they mean the same thing

2/17/2013, 5:31:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/babykage

Thanks a lot! Genitive seems to be another big task...

2/24/2013, 1:38:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
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I thought that when it comes to persons ONLY Genitiv case is possible. Is it really all right to say: "Das Haus von jemandem"?

8/28/2014, 8:20:35 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/rsline

Genitiv case is the correct standard form. There has been a bit of influence from the English language's use of "of" on Deutsch and which is more so used by the younger generation. In English one would say the house "of" my father. That is why jahudam mentioned "das Haus von (of) meinem Vater. This approach avoids Genitiv by using von and Dativ case, which is also correct (we do something similar in American English). Fair warning it may sound awkward to native Germans if you use this approach. Jokingly some people even call it the Vonitiv case (there is not such thing).

2/4/2015, 3:43:24 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Konrad-Michal
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Vonitiv - I like it! So is this correct or awkward to use "Vonitiv"?

2/4/2015, 8:53:03 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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Correct? No. Awkward? Not really.

In casual spoken German, it is indeed common to replace the genitive with von+dative. However, this is in most cases unacceptable in the standard language, so I wouldn't attempt it in formal speech or when writing. Often, the "Vonitiv" it sounds fine in spoken language (e.g. das Auto von meinem Bruder), but sometimes it really doesn't sound good (e.g. am Ende vom Tag [much better: des Tages]). I'd suggest that learners just stick to the genitive, it's more proper and you'll never be incorrect.

rsline is however wrong to say that this is from English influence. First of all, the genitive has had the tendency to be substituted by dative for centuries, and it is in fact practically non-existent in dialectal German. Secondly, we don't normally say the house of my father in English, that sounds quite formal and fancy, we say my father's house, which reflects German's somewhat dated preposed genitive meines Vaters Haus.

3/24/2016, 9:57:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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By the way, If you're specifically trying to say someone's house, the standard expression would be jemandes Haus.

3/24/2016, 9:39:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/duomashy
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"Gentiv mit von" is really bad style! But it's so common that there was even book published: "Der Dativ ist dem Genitv sein Tod. You should understand, but avoid using it.

4/13/2016, 9:49:31 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Frau_Lynda

You’re right it’s not “correct” or “proper”, but in conversational German it’s so often done, that I wouldn’t suggest avoiding it. Here’s why. The funny thing about Hochdeutsch is that it’s sort of like BBC English - not what is actually spoken with friends and family. In some instances, German dialects are so different people use Hochdeutsch as their common language. I’m at the point with German that learning a dialect and sounding more authentic is my goal. I’ve instructed German for years, so grammar is easy for me, but I want to break those rules, within reason and in the same manner as Germans do, to not sound like a radio announcer or textbook. Also, as you begin your German language journey don’t worry about correctness so much that it holds you back from communicating.

12/8/2017, 4:04:15 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/allsey87
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I'm pretty sure a more common and valid translation is: 'Sie gehen bei meinem Vater'... I know this works with 'bleiben' and 'wohnen', but not sure about 'gehen' can someone verify this?

4/30/2013, 6:22:19 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MrGirtman
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It doesn´t work with 'gehen'. Translated it would mean ' I´m going at my father´s place'. That´s why it has to be 'zu' which translates to 'to'.

1/23/2014, 9:46:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jimmyjamjim

Can I not say "ins Haus" or is it just "zum Haus"?

3/24/2014, 10:10:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dizrythmia
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"ins Haus" means you are going in the house. In the sentence Duolingo provided, there is no mention of whether or not the person is going inside, just that they are going to this house. In that context, it really only makes sense to use zu.

10/27/2014, 2:50:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/FoulDuFafa

I too do not understand why we cannot use nach Haus here. Doesn't zum Haus kinda mean in the house?

4/15/2014, 7:16:41 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/An_dz
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Same question, why not "nach das Haus"? Isn't it the right way to say you're "going to" somewhere in German?

10/11/2014, 2:59:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dizrythmia
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You can't say "das Haus" after nach as it is a dative preposition. It would have to be "nach dem Haus".

10/27/2014, 2:48:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/karlectron

When using 'nach' to express 'to', one needs to remember that it is used while referring to geographical locations only. the only exception I can recall is "nach Hause." This means going home. Here's a link http://german.about.com/library/weekly/aa061900a.htm

12/8/2014, 12:32:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/capt.cacan

Very useful link thanks!

9/23/2015, 11:57:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GSGilbert

Thanks. I posted a question, but I had not read this

6/5/2018, 10:13:53 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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Ohh Lord this concept is confusing. So let me get this straight.

Nach Hause = TO my house
Zu Hause = AT my house
Zum Hause [Name] = TO someone's house
Bei [Name] = AT someone's house

Is this right? Are there any more things I need to memorize? Because I keep getting these "house" questions wrong.

3/16/2015, 2:30:16 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Ksenijaven.

kann ich sagen : sie gehen zum meines vaters haus ???

12/15/2017, 9:37:12 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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No, the genitive always needs to come after the noun it's referring to-- a lot like saying "the house of my father." "zum meines Vaters Haus" sounds kind of like "to the of-my-father house," which is wrong. The correct wording is "zum Haus meines Vaters."

12/15/2017, 10:06:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/thutson
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I was taught and continue to teach my students that one can use "nach Hause" here in the following way: "Sie gehen zu meinem Vater nach Hause." Can a native speaker please comment on whether this sounds correct? Vielen Dank!

11/3/2018, 4:39:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/suecd48
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It seems that there are two correct choices here: "Sie gehen zum Haus von meinem Vater" (which is preferred by duolingo). But isn't "Sie gehen zu dem Haus meines Papas" also correct? Could a native German speaker please comment?

12/15/2018, 9:09:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Puett
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How about " Sie gehen zu meines Vaters Haus"? Duo doesn't accept it, but I think he should!

12/22/2018, 12:24:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/thutson
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The -s possessive ending can only be used with proper nouns. For example: "Das ist Sabines Haus." or "Das it Klaus' Haus."

If the possessor isn't a proper noun, then one has to either use the genitive or von + dative z..B. (zum Beispeil (For example)) Das ist das Haus meiner Schwester (meines Vaters) -- or -- Das ist das Haus von meiner Schwester (von meinem Vater)

But for your particular question, the "zu meinem Vater nach Hause" construction would probably be best or "zum Haus meines Vaters", or finally, "zum Haus von meinem Vater".

12/22/2018, 1:26:47 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ricardwolney
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Why they have accepted "zum Haus" and not "zu dem Haus"?

9/16/2014, 1:53:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/dizrythmia
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Zum is a contraction of zu + dem but zu dem is still correct. Did you report it?

12/4/2014, 10:02:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hed_Cyan
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Is there a more direct translation than Duolingo's offering? In English it is very awkward to say "They go to the house of my father" but that is the direct translation of this German sentence. Is there a way to say this without the awkward "the house of my father" portion?

10/22/2014, 6:50:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
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It's not awkward in German. You can say "Sie gehen zum Haus meines Vaters" or "Sie gehen zum Haus von meinem Vater". The former sounds more elegant.

10/22/2014, 6:55:19 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Hed_Cyan
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Thanks! Both of those sentences, directly translated, are a bit awkward in English. I am just trying to stick to direct translations when I can... Though here perhaps I can't!

10/22/2014, 7:34:32 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/aboutwhistles
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They go to my father's house works fine

2/29/2016, 7:54:54 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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OK, I have got a little stuck with this Genitive stuff. I've seen quite a few examples and the noun has stayed in it's Nominative state, with it's nominative definite article. eg: "Das ist das Auto meines Vaters". So, with that, I assumed: "sie gehen zu das Haus meines Vaters". Now, I see that the article has also been modified to "Dem" (Gen. (n))...how comes this has now been modified?

Secondly: If I have a sentence:

The man gives his father's bird to the dog.

Der Mann gibt der Vogel seines Vaters dem Hund. is it "der Vogel" or "des Vogel"?

12/4/2014, 8:18:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dizrythmia
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Das Haus becomes dem Haus because zu is a dative preposition and dem is the dative form of das. Then zu + dem contracts to zum.

With der Vogel, in that sentence it would become den Vogel as it's in the accusative case. Only a couple of nouns cause the object to stay in the nominative case: sein, werden, bleiben.

It wouldn't be des Vogels (note the s added to Vogel) because both can't be in the genitive case. It's certainly possible to construct a sentence with two consecutive genitive parts (I've written them), but to not have anything in another case to indicate they are in possession of it...okay this is sounding confusing, sorry. But what I mean is if the sentence were "Der Mann gibt des Vogels seines Vaters dem Hund" that would translate to "The man gives the father's bird's the dog" - it makes no sense.

12/4/2014, 10:01:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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Fantastic! Thank you for the explanations. Makes perfect sense - I am seeing and understanding the logic of cases FINALLY!

OK, gotcha, zu turns das Haus into a dative. https://au.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20121221093343AAr7cH9 A nice summary of all uses of 'zu'

I wasn't sure about "the bird" in my example, whether the Genitive negated the actual bird changing case or not at all. I see that it is the direct object (Accusative), just as a generic bowl (eine Schüssel) or a ball (einen Ball) would be, if no one actually owned them.

The examples I have found kept the object in Nominative, because there was no subject doing anything. "Das ist das Auto meines Vaters" - (that is the car of my father), simple nominative, no transitive verb, not accusative.

So, when the genitive is used (indicating possession), the case of the noun that is possessed stays in whatever case it would be, if there was no genitive possessor mentioned.

"Ich spiele mit den Ball meiner Mutter".

I play with the (acc, m) ball, (gen, f) [of] my mother.

12/5/2014, 1:19:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/karlectron

Ich spiele mit 'dem' Ball meiner Mutter

12/9/2014, 3:29:18 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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Ah, yes, sorry. Because "der Ball" is Dative, not Accusative, and that is because it is receiving me playing with it via the word "mit", rather than being the direct object of a transitive verb - eg "Ich mag den Ball", "Ich spiele FußBall". So one can give, like, eat, etc directly the object, which makes the object Accusative. But if one is doing something with something, 'sitting with a dog', then it is a Dative object, receiving you/the subject.

I'm almost down with cases

12/9/2014, 11:58:39 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/karlectron

Yes you are doing well! I try to associate the following prepositions with always using the Dativ: Mit, bei, gegenueber, nach, zu, von, aus, ausser, and seit. Other prepositions can also be Dativ as long as there is no implied movement taking place. For instance; an, auf, hinter, in, ueber, vor, zwischen, neben, and unter. Du stellst den Ball auf den Teppich. Akk use of auf. You are placing the ball on the carpet. Movement is taking place. Du stehst auf dem Teppich. Dativ use of auf. You are standing on the carpet. No movement implied.

12/10/2014, 3:27:59 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/karlectron

Just a side note about 'zu.' In the above sentence "Sie gehen zum Haus... This is implying movement, However, zu is exclusively Dativ when it is used as a preposition.

12/10/2014, 3:32:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/L5730
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Good stuff @Karlectron. I have a few bits of info written out about prepositions, and when to use Dative (location)/Accusative (movement). Of course I will have to commit all of it to memory for it to be of any real use.

All of these cases, the adjective and noun endings as well as the relative noun genders is a huge amount of stuff for someone to learn who doesn't have any of it in their native language.

Thankfully, I am past the stages of just calling it all "ridiculous" now that I can see connections and logic. I, like everyone else on Duo Lingo, shouldn't be here because we wan't to discuss the 'point' of having all of this relative complication compared with our native tongue, but should be here to learn, improve, understand and help our fellow language learning community.

Thanks for the pointers. It's all sinking in :)

12/10/2014, 3:48:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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So why not say "ins Haus" instead of "zum Haus"?

3/25/2015, 12:46:12 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/MilicaLjum

Apparently zu dem and zum does not mean the same in this sentence? Why is only zum correct?

4/8/2015, 4:34:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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They are the same. You should report it.

4/9/2015, 2:26:03 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/darraghflah

Why can you not sau "Sie gehen bei meinem Vater"?

6/5/2015, 10:03:31 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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I don't think "bei" allows for motion. It only means "at", not "to".

6/5/2015, 11:47:46 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ljupcosst66

Sie gehen meines Vaters Haus - not cortect. WHY???!

9/30/2016, 11:53:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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That means "they go my father's house" and doesn't make sense, you're missing a preposition and it should be "sie gehen zu meines Vaters Haus" or in more modern German "sie gehen zum Haus meines Vaters".

10/1/2016, 1:18:23 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ljupcosst66

Das stimmt. Vielen Dank.

10/1/2016, 9:01:38 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/KMosuzu

Why is Sie gehen zum Haus von meinem Vater. correct? I was taught ´von´is only used for plural nouns, such as von Eltern. Or it can be used for any nouns? If we can use von for any nouns, how can we distinguish the usage?

1/23/2017, 12:09:17 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/TrioLinguist
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It's actually not really correct, but it's acceptable in colloquial language. Normally von is used as a resort when a genitive would otherwise have to stand alone. So:

  • die Farbe von Wasser = the colour of water
  • die Farbe des Wassers = the colour of the water
  • die Farbe vom/von dem Wasser = the colour of the water (non-standard)

Similarly with plural nouns:

  • die Rechte von Kindern = the rights of children
  • die Rechte der Kinder = the rights of the children
  • die Rechte von den Kindern = the rights of the children (non-standard)
1/23/2017, 8:54:10 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KMosuzu

Thank you for the detailed explanation! Very helpful. So, von is used rather 'to nouns expressing general' things ? i.e. von Wasser is rather general water while des Wassers is for specific water ? But then why can it be used in front ofmy father`which is specific. I checked several examples to figure von is often used before specific names, but I cannot find any other examples using von. If this is a minor issue in German, please forget it. I know not everything has an answer!

1/23/2017, 10:29:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/NickVasque2

Why is "Sie gehen zum meines Vaters Haus" incorrect?

11/30/2017, 4:06:17 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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Because "zum" is "to the". That makes it like "They go to the my father's house" It should be phrased more like "They go to the house of my father", "Sie gehen zum Haus meines Vaters"

11/30/2017, 4:19:40 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ellablun
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Why is it meinem vater, isn't this supposed to be genitive and thus meines vaters?

12/8/2017, 3:05:11 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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"Zum Haus meines Vaters" is perfectly correct. (And "zum Haus meinem Vater" is not.)

Did you perhaps see "zum Haus von meinem Vater?" In this case, it wouldn't be a genitive. "Vater" would be in the dative, since it's after "von," which always takes the dative after it-- hence the dative conjugation "meinem."

12/15/2017, 10:09:39 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/GSGilbert

why not "… nach dem Haus …"? Thanks

6/5/2018, 10:12:22 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Maria734412
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I don't understand why there is an "s" at the end

6/26/2018, 4:33:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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At the end of "Vaters"? Or "meines"? Both are because "meines Vaters" is in the genitive case. The form of "mein" for masculine (or neuter) genitive is "meines." Also, any masculine or neuter noun gets an "-s" at the end when it's in the genitive.

6/26/2018, 5:17:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Anthea626456
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Anstatt "gehen", kann man "fahren" benutzen? (instead of "gehen" can one say "fahren". To my knowledge they both mean to go but with different implications of how you go. "Gehen" implies walking while "fahren" implies driving, is this correct?

10/9/2018, 10:28:50 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/ilstam
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Why not "vateres"?

10/25/2018, 1:46:56 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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The correct genitive form for "Vater" is "Vaters." In general, you should default to just "-s" unless it would be hard to pronounce that way.

10/25/2018, 4:16:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/pboGiDjx

Why gehen is not the last word of the phrase?

10/29/2018, 5:37:07 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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This would only occur if the sentence were a subordinate clause like "Sie sind nicht hier, weil sie zum Haus meines Vaters gehen".

In other words, there still needs to be a main clause where the verb comes second (In this case the "Sie sind" clause)

10/29/2018, 7:38:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/-Copernicus-
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Why should it be? German verbs generally go in the second position of the sentence, so since "sie" is the first element here, "gehen" comes right after.

10/29/2018, 7:02:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Gela572227
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Der Dativ ist dem Genitv sein Tod (German: the dative case is the genitive case's death)

2/23/2019, 3:02:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3
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The proposed sentence was "zum Haus meinEM Vater . No sentence was correct

12/30/2018, 4:49:12 PM
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