"Egy gyerek az utcáról belép a házba."

Translation:A child steps into the house from the street.

September 4, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/garpike

'A child steps into the house from the street'?
'A child from the street steps into the house' has very different connotations.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Yes, those sound better. The "child from the street(s)" would probably be "utcagyerek". But here, this Hungarian sentence does not have that connotation. Yet, I would rearrange it a little bit, to "Egy gyerek belép az utcáról a házba". It sounds more normal, or neutral, to me.

September 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Hulk014

This is because you can say in hungarian either "Egy gyerek belép a házba az utcáról" or " Egy gyerek az utcáról belép a házba. " and meaning won't change.

September 4, 2016

[deactivated user]

    I am not sure trying to translate everything into english (subject,verb,object) is really all that productive. I think the important thing is that one can make sense of it. However it can be annoying given the limitations of the way duo works. I try not to get too literal as long as I understand generally. What do others think.

    July 7, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

    I agree with you. The DL English is sometimes very rough, and it could be improved; but you can nevertheless tell from it whether or not you have understood the Hungarian.

    July 31, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    Well it's a stupid sentence. We have flying kindergarten teachers which is obviously trying to be a funny phrase so I can accept that, but this really seems to mean streetchildren / street urchins / homeless, or wandering without supervision. I understand Hungarian pretty well and I really didn't get this.

    January 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

    Is it the Hungarian sentence that you find stupid, or the English sentence, or both?

    I am just learning Hungarian, but as I read the Hungarian sentence here, I don't see anything about urchins or homeless street children. Instead, I see a sentence that I would translate into English as "A child steps into the house from the street." A normal, understandable concept.

    So (if my understanding of the Hungarian is correct) the English DL gives here ("A child from the street steps into the house.") is not correct. The word order is wrong for the meaning intended.

    But nevertheless, I can tell from the bad DL English that I understood the Hungarian correctly, even if DL got the English wrong. That is the only point I was trying to make in my earlier post.

    It would be nicer if DL got the English right, but it would be much worse if they got the Hungarian wrong.

    January 11, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

    Not for Hungarians trying to learn English!

    February 1, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    In English People don’t “Step in” See my link to csipke100 below.

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Evolita

    Right on, Zsuzsi! Twisted Hungarian sentences with unnatural English translations is the common theme here... I cannot believe how poor this Beta version is.

    May 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/csipke100

    I’m sure the people in the house wouldn’t be too happy with some strange child stepping in from the street. Shouldn’t it be “a child steps into the house from the street “. Word order matters in English

    March 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    Actually, in English, children or people don't "step into a house" - using a literal translation for "belép" or any variation of that is not used in English, no matter what the word order is.

    Here are examples of step used in English sentences: http://sentence.yourdictionary.com/step

    A comment from me: "Would you like to step in?" is okay in British English but not in American English.

    March 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/csipke100

    I beg to differ, Zsuzsi, “step into a house” is legitimate English usage. Not common, I agree, but acceptable. I can’t say what they don’t accept in American English, I live in Australia and I try not to let the Americans dictate to me how I should use my native tongue

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/garpike

    'Stepping into a house' sounds perfectly normal to British ears; it seems quite likely that some of the Hungarian contributors were primarily familiar with British English, considering the geographical proximity and ease of travel.
    Your own link gives several examples of 'stepping into' rooms ('Will you step into the study?', etc.), however; would you say that in the U.S.? What exactly do you propose replacing this phrase with?

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    The problem is that often only one correct solution is accepted on Duo and we have to learn what they expect us to say and feed it back to them. There are too many sentences that are literally translated and don’t sound right to ears in many places in the world.

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    Not exactly, because there are so many ways to make this request, but one could be, "Would you come in here for a minute please?"

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

    I would say that "step in" is quite normal and natural in American English. For example, there is the (dreaded) sentence from your boss, "Would you step into my office for a moment please?"

    I grew up in the Midwest and now live in Connecticut. Perhaps Zsuzsi is from a different part of the US. Or maybe all she really means is that she herself does not use the phrase.

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

    I suppose the link was a bad idea. Let’s remember that the reason for my comment was due to the DUO translation of a Hungarian sentence. What they wanted was, " A child from the street steps into the house." That sounds wrong to me. Doesn't it to you? "Would you step into my office for a moment please?" sounds fine.

    I didn’t intend to start an argument. I have been very frustrated by too many literal DUO translations that did not even include one synonym in the algorithm.

    I have lived in the States and went to high school and university here but English is not my native language. I was born in Hungary and due to immigration had to learn German and French as well.

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/csipke100

    Your English is good Zsuzsi but like all languages, English is complex and is complicated by the fact that it’s spoken differently in different countries. I get annoyed when Duo won’t accept words I use, like pavement or shop or plane, which are more likely to be used where I live. I understand the software allows limited space but it’s language learning software and it shouldn’t just teach the language but confidence in its use. It’s not doing well at the second and the bodgy translations are the main reason why

    March 7, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Evolita

    we use "ENTER" instead of "step"

    May 4, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

    Hi, csipke100. Yes, I think you are right about the correct English word order for this exercise. See some of the comments earlier in this thread.

    March 6, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

    Nonetheless, the ambiguity exists in English and thus should be taken into account.

    July 1, 2017
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