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  5. "A turisták átsétálnak az utc…

"A turisták átsétálnak az utcán."

Translation:The tourists walk across the street.

September 9, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragoncurve

if I remember correctly, that's just how the át- is used. it means going over or through something, ending up on the other side.

"átmegyek az utcán" - "I am going through on the street" i.e. "I am crossing the street"

"átmegyek a parkon" - "I am going through on the park" i.e. "I am going through the park (and end up on the other side)"

"átmegyek a szobán" - "I am going through on the room" i.e. "I am going through the room (and come out the other side)"

I don't know whether there are examples where -át requires -ban/ben, but these are the examples I learned in another course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dragoncurve

and a duolingo example in this lesson that I came across just after answering here:

"A macska átnéz az ablakon" - "The cat is looking through on the window" i.e. "The cat is looking through the window"

I guess it's to separate "through" and "across" from "over", which is used as the english tranlation in all the cases where there is just a movement to the side "over to the other country" or "over to the other room" or "move over on the sofa". In these cases, there is no -on/en, because nothing is being crossed through like a street, a park or a window is in the examples above.

@any proficient Hungarian speaker: please confirm or deny. I just made up a nice hypothesis that explains the example sentences that I've seen, but don't know whether it's true or not


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bnyugat

are walking is ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/peter933474

Why is walking through the street wrong? How would you say that in hungarian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

I am not sure what it means in English. What do you mean by walking through a street?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Actually I would think "through" would be if you were on the footpath and pushing through people to make your way along the street.

Otherwise, you have a tunnel boring machine and you bore from one side to the other under the street.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bastette54

I gave what I thought would be the acceptable sentence: "The tourists walk over onto the street." And that was rejected (rightfully) in favor of the much better one above. Can't win! :)

One question: why is "utcán" in the (?) case. (Sorry, I don't remember the name, it's the one with on/en endings.) That would be "on the street" correct? How does that become "across the street"? I guess, literally, they would be walking across on the street?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

Literally maybe. You probably know the answer to your own question by now. Some of these expressions are just associated with this (?) case. Maybe especially the preverb "át-", but others may do it, as well.
"Átlépek a lábadon" - I step over your foot.
"Átmegyek a szobán" - I walk/go across the room.
"Áthajtok a piroson" - I run a red light.
"Átkelek a zebrán" - I go across on the crosswalk.
"Kimegyek az ablakon (keresztül)" - I go out through the window.
Etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathyLudan

How about crossing the street?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anne306464

Is there a significant difference between street and road? My answer : 'the tourists are walking across the road ' is marked as being wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jzsuzsi
Mod
  • 773

street = utca

road = út

út is usually wider/longer than an utca


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

In English (at least in NZ) there is a significant difference. "Street" is smaller and within a community, "Road" is often between communities. When you look at a street map for a city and see "roads" you can visualize how the city was once made up of lots of little places - linked by roads.

Also a "road" is often just the path. A "street" includes all that is on it.

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