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  5. "Η σύζυγός μου φοράει ένα μπλ…

"Η σύζυγός μου φοράει ένα μπλε φόρεμα."

Translation:My wife wears a blue dress.

September 10, 2016

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

When I hover over the word "σύζυγός" it shows both "wife" and "husband"- how can this be? Does it mean "spouse"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

Yes, it's Ο σύζυγος and Η σύζυγος. The husband and the wife.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Literally, someone to whom you are yoked together, from συν "with; together" + ζυγός "yoke".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLySD9eGoy

So..."unequally yoked together" is IMPLICITLY referring to marriage? (and that ONLY?)...or, Is that part of a more complex discussion than could be dealt with by just looking at the word?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

What mizinamo is trying to show is the etymology of the word to help you with other words that might have the same prefix. "συν" in general means "together" as we say "connect", "cooperate" "contribute" and many others which in Greeκ all use συν. I don't see any mention of the word "unequally...". There is nothing more complex.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLySD9eGoy

Just wanted to see if I could understand the "Koine Greek" phrase found in the New Testament: "[ mē ginomai heterozygeō ]" (since ' σύζυγός ' came up in this phrase) by looking at the modern greek... or hoping that someone would know about that. Thanks, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdGar983049

How come the word has two accents? I think it's a mistake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

At first, I thought the same thing- then I noticed a pattern: In Greek, proparoxytones become secondarily oxytone when followed by a genitive enclitic. More simply put, words that are stressed on the third to last syllable acquire an extra stress on the last syllable when they are "possessed." So...o/η σύζυγος (the husband/wife) becomes ο/η σύζυγός μου (my husband/wife). Similarly, το αυτοκίνητο (the car) become το αυτοκίνητό σου (your car).

Edit: I just saw that jaye16 responded and his/her explanation probably makes more sense than mine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

'Way to go' Raleigh that is exactly it and so well put. Many thanks, help from the community will make the course better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

Δεν κάνει τίποτα. :) I have a degree in linguistics, so I can usually notice language patterns fairly quickly for myself, unfortunately I don't always know how to explain them to others very well, but I am glad if I helped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

Yes, you also picked up on some other items (don't remember which) now I get it. You explained this very well and you surely do help with all your comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

It's one of the exceptions, but a rather logical one. When a word is accented on the third syllable from the end and is followed be a word with no accent: μου, my, της - her etc you then have four syllables pronounced as one word.

It doesn't exactly roll off the tongue. So we accent the last syllable of the noun to make it smoother. Both accented syllables are stressed.
So, with only one accent you have: o SI zi gos mu

but with the extra accent you get: o SI zi GOS mu. Hope this helps any questions just ask.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke407132

So just to double check, I could have also said η γυναίκα μου...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

So just to double check, I could have also said η γυναίκα μου...?

In a listening exercise, no -- you have to type what you hear.

If you're just talking Greek, then yes, η γυναίκα μου means pretty much the same thing as η σύζυγός μου.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robert672165

I understand that both forms are accepted, but this translation suggests that my wife has only one dress. More likely, the speaker means that at this time she is wearing a blue dress.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16
Mod
  • 322

Well, it does say "she wears" and since Greek does not have a continuous tense it also means "she is wearing" and if we wanted to say "she has..." we would have used "έχει".

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