"Jullie zijn professionele soldaten."

Translation:You are professional soldiers.

2 years ago

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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I find it interesting that the Dutch word soldaten so closely resembles the Spanish (and probably other Latin languages) soldados for soldier as opposed to words used by other Nordic or Teutonic languages.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackleaf42
blackleaf42
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I looked it up, and it is a loan word, so that may explain why :P (from the French "soldat", borrowed from the Italian "soldato"). But I believe most of the other germanic languages borrowed it as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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Yup, German, der Soldat, Portuguese O Soldado , Even the Russian "Солдат" is sounded "Soldat"... Interestingly, the Latin for soldier is Miles (root for military) although "bellator" is another word (more akin to warrior). Which makes me wonder at the actual root for "soldier" since it seems to pervade even across all of the Romance (Latin) languages as well? :P (Note since then: Found out it derives from an English word tracing to the French Soudeer, which suggested a mercenary, or paid fighter--there is also a Medieval Latin for mercenary -- "soldarius" (one receiving pay-a hireling).. I find that interesting which is why I'm so into all these languages.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baerghest
baerghest
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I think the only modern germanic language not to use a cognate is Islandic, which used "Hermaður" (army-man). That word is perserved as a personal name in German (Hermann). Although the word can easily be constructed from survivng words, the Danish version of the name is definitely reintroduced from German, with attendant changes in spelling (i.e. Herman, as opposed to Hærmand).

7 months ago
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