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  5. "The king has a shield."

"The king has a shield."

Translation:Ο βασιλιάς έχει μία ασπίδα.

September 10, 2016

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ioanna678593

"μία" ,"μια" are the same in Greek. Duo wrote is a typo to write "μια"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

Oops. It seems like μια wasn't added in all of the alternative translations. It is now, thank you for your comment. ^.^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Speugenia

"ο Βασιλιάς έχει ασπίδα" should also be an accepted translation as in EN you never say "the king has shield". You always use the "a" though in GR you can do it both ways.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marva441926

Is it common for feminine nouns which ended in -ίς in Attic Greek (ἡ ᾰ̓σπῐ́ς) to end in -ίδα in Modern Greek? Did the old accusative case become the new nominative case as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Is it common for feminine nouns which ended in -ίς in Attic Greek (ἡ ᾰ̓σπῐ́ς) to end in -ίδα in Modern Greek? Did the old accusative case become the new nominative case as well?

In general, masculine and feminine third-declension nouns of Ancient Greek were reanalysed based on their accusative forms, moving into the first declension.

For example:

  • η ασπίς, της ασπίδος, την ασπίδα --> η ασπίδα, της ασπίδας, την ασπίδα
  • η πόλις, της πόλεως, την πόλιν --> η πόλη, της πόλης, την πόλη(ν)
  • ο πατήρ, του πατρός, τον πατέρα --> ο πατέρας, του πατέρα, τον πατέρα

Sometimes, this can even give forms that are impossible in Ancient Greek, as when η δύναμις became η δύναμη, genitive της δύναμης, with an accent on the antepenult even though the final syllable is "long".

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