1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Greek
  4. >
  5. "Καλούν την μητέρα τους;"

"Καλούν την μητέρα τους;"

Translation:Are they calling their mother?

September 11, 2016

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isidor868839

The voice is not raising here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TomHamelri

she doesn't pronounce it as a question


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

She probably doesn't pronounce it as a question clearly enough, but the question mark is there, both in English and in Greek. O.o


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gpbalis

i have also used this as an informal way to say are they inviting their mother.

I know πρόσκληση is the formal word for invitation. But can Καλούν in this exercise also be used for inviting?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theo_Matrakas

Yes, it can used for inviting, but προσκαλούν is preferable :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ozneer

Is there another verb for "calling"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dimitra956826

The verb call has multiple meanings in English.

  • It may be used for calling someone on their phone (therefore, καλώ, τηλεφωνώ, or παίρνω τηλέφωνο in Greek.)

  • It may be used to name, identify or describe sne or sth (in which case, ονομάζω, and αποκαλώ would be used in Greek.)

  • It could also be used to summon, request of beckon (in which case, καλώ would be used.)

It depends on the meaning and context. ^.^


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil682961

I've listened again and again, and every time the first word sounds like καλήν - the second vowel sounds nothing like ου to me. Is it just my ears?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

It's clear by the standards of the TTS system. Here's a Greek pronouncing the same word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phil682961

Thanks. Your link does indeed sound like καλούν to me.

Here's καλήν from the same site: https://es.forvo.com/search/%CE%BA%CE%B1%CE%BB%CE%AE%CE%BD/

But Duo's TTS here still sounds much more like Forvo's καλήν than καλούν to me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apriltulip

I wrote it as a statement "they are calling.." How do I know when it's a question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The question mark ";" at the end of the sentence shows that it's a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean618907

Usually you can also hear it, because the intonation raises at the end (same as in English), but the voice sample is not good here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JanetOlson3

The Greek question mark looks like a semicolon, also listen carefully to the tone. I miss these a lot, because I'm paying attention to word order, and not to punctuation or tone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

The question tone is not reproduced here. I know I should be looking at the punctuation, but the tone is entrapment. Of course, I have the opposite problem in some other programmes tgat always seem to be in the question tone. Perhaps we should leave the tone to the Chinese and Vietnamese programmes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Summer2104

Wouldnt 'they are calling their mother' be correct too ? Isnt it the tone that makes it a question ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/troll1995
Mod
  • 237

Please, read the discussion above for details. It's the question mark that makes it a question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alison336345

The audio is straightforward and does not indicate a question....therefore the translation is They are calling their mother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

The audio isn't great here, indeed. However, as it has been mentioned, the question mark at the end of the sentence is still there. Was it a listening exercise maybe?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SheilaCham7

I know there is a question mark at the end of the written form, but I like to see if I can understand the spoken form before reading it, therefore was not aware it was a question because she did not raise her voice at the end of it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Greek is the only Duolingo programme in which punctuation is made so important.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

It's a whole different symbol, so that makes sense, but it's not like exercises are deemed incorrect whenever punctuation is the only omission. It doesn't sound like a clear question, but this doesn't affect the correct answer (even when it's a "type-what-you-hear" exercise, one can't get it wrong if they type in the words they hear).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Every punctuation symbol is different in every language, or we would simply call the ones that were the same one symbol. I did speak too rashly, though, as only some of the languages that do not change the structure of the sentence when making a question accept the answer as a statement as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.Georgopoulos

How many European languages have a question mark symbol that's not "?", though?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Greek and Armenian come to mind.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

How interesting. I taught myself the Armenian alphabet decades ago when travelling there, but I don't think I learned the punctuation even then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

None, to my knowledge, though Spanish does add one (or at least did). I suppose I should think of this as a bit of alphabet practice, really.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Plakakaneis

On my phone the question mark wasnt obvious as it was on its own on a second line

Learn Greek in just 5 minutes a day. For free.