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  5. "אני אוכל ארוחת צהריים זולה."

"אני אוכל ארוחת צהריים זולה."

Translation:I am eating a cheap lunch.

September 11, 2016

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

I tried, "I'm eating an inexpensive lunch," and they marked it wrong. I have reported it -- September 2018


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, it is advisable not to translate adjectives by their negated adjectives here, because a אֲרוּחָה לֹא יְקָרָה exists too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcocanel10

COULD THE ANSWER BEׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁׁ....................I AM EATING A LIGHT LUNCH...PLEASE HELP ME OUT////THANKS


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/potatohead7

No, I would use "קלה" for "light".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcocanel10

Thank you for your answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xenia288915

ארוחת צהריים זאת נקבה (כמו אישה) כי זה צורה משתי שמות עצם ארוחה + צהריים. ארוחה זולה. ולמשל אוכל (זכר) זול.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahBerry17

To joelnaqqar: In case you are still interested, zol/זול is the masculine form of the word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snezhi

Makes me think of Émile Zola who was one of the few famous authors of the 19th century to actually make money. The irony!! Zola was not זולה (yes, I realize it should be זול).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, he is actually written אמיל זולא, a spelling which looks slightly Aramaic. But this seems to be a convention for French names, if you look at someone like אלכסנדר דיומא.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Snezhi

Hey, that’s cool! So names would be spelled how they are pronounced, not how they are written in the original language? Meaning, Dumas becomes Duma because in French the “s” is not pronounced?

Also... so זולא was not זולה :) Thanks for helping me make my silly pun! And yes, it does sound slightly Aramaic although the only thing I know about Aramaic is what I have read on the forums here so obviously I don’t know that much. But I remember that ‘aleph’ at the end of the word was the Aramaic equivalent for ‘he’ at the beginning in Hebrew. I find all of these connections really interesting. I would actually love to dig deeper into Aramaic as well but I already have a lot of “irons in the fire” so maybe later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, as the concept of silent consonants is rather foreign to Hebrew, you usually omit them in Hebrew: So Illinois /ˌɪləˈnɔɪ/ is אילינוי without a ס at the end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

Your "without a samekh at the end" comment made me chuckle, because I've occasionally heard fellow Americans mispronounce the Land of Lincoln with a z sound at the end. Be well.

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