"The spoon sweet."

Translation:Το γλυκό του κουταλιού.

9/12/2016, 8:49:51 PM

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/judysqaures
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I was sure this was some kind of error too ('the spoon's sweet'?)! But apparently not. Well now I know something new about Greek, Balkan, Russian and Middle Eastern hospitality customs! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoon_sweets

9/25/2016, 11:08:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Isn't it interesting learning about how people live. After my last post here I went out a bought a jar of grape spoon sweets and served it to friends. They enjoyed the memories it brought.

9/25/2016, 12:22:09 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaithiWalsh
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Ha! Brilliant. Myself, I didn't have a spoonful of sugar, though I did listen to the song...

9/25/2016, 12:23:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mcampanella
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I came to complain. Glad this was the top comment

2/10/2018, 12:55:25 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaithiWalsh
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Indeed! In Ireland and the UK, it's quite normal to say 'a spoonful (of)'; I don''t know what they say in the U.S. There's even a well-known song, from a very popular 60s film, on this very topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLkp_Dx6VdI

9/25/2016, 11:32:13 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Now, I'll be singing it all day. I did love that movie and this song in particular. Thank you for the link. And yes we say "a spoonful" as well as "a spoon" in Amer. Eng.

9/25/2016, 12:23:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/bonbayel
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Although the Greek is "the sweet of the spoon"—backwards.

4/11/2018, 7:11:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Goren17
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Indeed we have those things in Russia, but I could never in my life have guessed they are called "spoon sweets". Certainly nobody calls them this here.

4/13/2018, 9:56:22 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon345104
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Amazing learn something new every day

9/15/2018, 8:35:16 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/SarahLinguist
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Very interesting! Thanks to everyone who investigated this, it had me baffled!

3/8/2017, 4:04:25 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/kopre
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Learn something new each day!!

3/13/2017, 12:37:20 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon345104
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Ignor last comment I found out what they are

11/18/2017, 7:15:27 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Well, there is a rather long well-documented post right on this page explaining that.

11/18/2017, 7:32:00 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaithiWalsh
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This item makes no sense in English - viz., 'the spoon sweet' isn't correct English. I'm not sure what it's supposed to mean.

9/12/2016, 8:49:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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It is strange indeed but true. It's called γλυκό του κουταλιού.which is literally sweet of the spoon but called spoon sweets in English. Just think "jam" which is served on a small spoon on a tiny plate with a glass of cold water beside it. It's rather out of fashion now but our γιαγιάδες (grannies) used to make it. You eat the sweet, make a wish to the host and hostess and drink the water. Hope you're enjoying the Greek course. We're her for any queries.

9/12/2016, 9:12:30 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/theodhoraqis
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This still exists in Albania, at least in the areas closer to Greece (Κορυτσά or Korça to be precise), mostly with fruits like cherries, figs, grapes, or even watermelon. We just call it "liko" but it's still offered on a spoon with coffee and water. Thank you so much for making this course possible. It's been a blast discovering all these cultural and linguistic similarities.

11/23/2016, 4:00:48 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Thank you for your kind words and for sharing the information about the "liko" I really wonder if the word comes from the Greek ΄γλυκο'. Yes, it is wonderful seeing how close people really are and heart warming.

11/23/2016, 4:48:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/theodhoraqis
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I think you're right about the Greek origins. If not from γλυκο then perhaps the Ancient Greek γλυκυς. Depending on where they're from, sometimes you hear people say "gliko", which sounds nearly identical to the Greek pronunciation. It makes me wonder whether Ancient Greeks were such impressive hosts that it inspired Albanians to learn how to make their own γλυκο to return the favor.

11/23/2016, 9:35:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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That's one of the benefits of learning languages it creates an interest in so many diverse areas. From sweets to ancient history. Pretty broad spectrum and so much in between.

11/23/2016, 10:06:38 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/EdGar983049

That used to exist in Bulgaria too. It's called "white sweet" and is a spoonful of a very dense white sweet in a glass of water. No one makes this anymore and I'm not sure people outside the area know about it

9/23/2016, 7:09:29 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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What you describe sounds similar to καϊμάκι in Greece - not quite the same as γλυκό του κουταλιού which is more like a thick jam or preserved fruit.

11/19/2016, 11:09:06 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/DaithiWalsh
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Wow. I had never, ever come across either the term or the practice of spoon sweets. But still, it seems to be a Greek thing, right? I've never observed (or heard of) it in Ireland or the UK - I mean, the serving of the jam on the spoon, making a wish, etc. So it looks like we're kind of both correct: 'the spoon sweet' isn't correct English, no, but it's the (correct or literal) translation of a real Greek practice, yes. But yes, I'm liking (!) the Greek course. I'm living in Athens, so the course is proving useful in a practical way.

9/12/2016, 9:16:58 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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I'm very glad to hear you're pleased with the course. We're still very new and the terrain is rather bumpy but we're working at getting out all the rocks. Ah, so you live in Athens. Of course, you haven't come across spoon sweets which as I said are out of style. The name, however, is correct not just a translation. You'll find it in on google with photos. Since you'll have a chance to use the Greek first hand do get back to us with comments. We'd appreciate it. Have a great evening. Καληνύχτα!.

9/12/2016, 9:27:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaoxuanLi
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I was very surprised to learn about the spoon sweets. thanks for the info.

10/2/2016, 3:38:04 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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You're welcome and now if you are served one you'll be prepared.

We say:

στην υγειά σου -- To your health (one person), στην υγειά σας (plural and/or polite/formal), στην υγειά μας (to our health).

These are all good for making a toast with a drink. Oh, and also to wish someone "Use it in good health." if he's gotten something new.

10/2/2016, 7:07:27 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Vjeko13
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Customs aside, "the spoon sweet" is just broken English.

3/19/2017, 8:09:26 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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I beg to differ. It is perfectly correct and is the name in English of a kind of dessert. I just googled "spoon sweet" and got 32 million pages. Try it you'll see something new.

3/19/2017, 8:54:13 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Vjeko13
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3/19/2017, 8:57:21 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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:-) No, prob.

3/19/2017, 9:39:37 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristineckaK
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Is the singular correct though? I only see spoon sweetS everywhere.

6/4/2017, 5:02:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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"What did you choose for dessert?" "The spoon sweet."
It's correct in either singular or plural.

6/4/2017, 5:51:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/KeithAndre18

In English we refer to "sweets" to generically describe the category of small sugary desserts or treats like chocolates, or hard candies. In English we wouldn't usually use it in the singular, as we would be more specific, as in "I ate a chocolate" not "I ate a sweet", but the latter would not be grammatically incorrect. So, who are we to say "spoon sweet" is not the best English translation of a Greek dessert, just because it sounds foreign to us? It is foreign, after all, from Greece!

7/14/2018, 3:38:43 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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The translation is not ours but what is used in English speaking countries...the US, the UK, and Australia according to the references below.

7/14/2018, 4:00:04 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil682961

Slightly off the topic of spoon sweets, but "I ate a sweet" is fine in British English. It's what you might say if you ate a mint, or one of those hard candies, or similar. Not a chocolate though!

7/30/2018, 7:21:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne1234567

This makes no sense at all in English.

9/12/2018, 12:56:16 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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If you read the comments and many of the links I've supplied you'll see that this may be a new idea for you but actually it is a kind of food that is well known in many English speaking people in the world. Please read the comments before commenting.

The OXFORD ENCYCLOPEDIA of Food and Drink in America https://books.google.gr/books?isbn=0199734968

So, the expression is indeed known in the English language. And for other info check out the comments on this page.

AMAZON Buy Greek Spoon Sweet at AMAZON - Low Prices on Greek Spoon Sweet‎ Ad www.amazon.co.uk/Grocery/Shopping‎ Here just a few: I beg to differ. It is perfectly correct and is the name in English of a kind of dessert. I just googled "spoon sweet" and got 32 million pages. Try it you'll see something new.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoon_sweets

It is well known in other European countries. I was in NEW YORK and saw them on shelves in Good Foods.

See some images of spoon sweets here: PINTEREST https://www.pinterest.com/elenaki73/greek-spoon-sweets/

And a few recipes: Cherry Spoon Sweets - MARTHA STEWARD http://www.marthastewart.com/1159849/cherry-spoon-sweets

WWW FOOD .COM http://www.food.com/recipe/orange-peel-spoon-sweet-glyko-portokalaki-4512.

GOOD FOOD https://www.goodfoodstories.com/spoon-sweets/

Along with a language goes its culture and learning a language adds to your general knowledge.

P.S. Martha Steward is the most well-known cooking show host in the US. the UK:

http://realhellenictaste.co.uk/product-category/spoon-sweets/

Spoon Sweet Sour Cherry 500g · Spoon Sweets. £5.50. quince · Add to Cart · Spoon Sweet Quince 500g · Spoon Sweets ... Email:info@realhellenictaste.co.uk*

AUSTALIA

http://aussietaste.recipes/glossary/food-items-a-to-z/spoon-sweets/

Apr 1, 2014 - Spoon sweets are sweet preserves, served in a spoon as a gesture of hospitality in the Balkans, the Middle East, and in Russia. They can be ...

The USA

http://hot969boston.com/2016/03/29/springtime-snacks-greek-apricot-spoon-sweets/

Mar 29, 2016 - Our friends at America's Test Kitchen have shared another great recipe ... The serving of “spoon sweets” in Greece and parts of the Middle East ..

4.8 rating for amazon.co.uk Save Time and Do Groceries Online Now. Free UK Delivery on Eligible Orders!

Just a few of the many. See above for images and a few recipes.

9/12/2018, 2:58:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaCham7

What on Earth is a spoon sweet? It does not make sense in English.

11/26/2018, 8:51:09 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
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Please see the other comments. It's a word for something that is common in Greece but not common in the English-speaking world, so you may not have come across the concept.

I also recommend doing an image search for the phrase "greek spoon sweet"

11/26/2018, 8:53:00 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/SheilaCham7

Thank you. I have googled and found images of jam type preserves. I have been a very frequent traveller in Greece since 1992 and owned a house there since 2002 and have never come across these delicacies nor their name! You live and learn!

11/26/2018, 11:51:14 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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There are several explanations on this stream including many authoritative citations. New languages sometimes introduce new ideas, however, you'll see here that spoon sweets are known in the US, the UK, Canada, Austrailia, etc.

11/26/2018, 2:02:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Oh, just noticed that you had already seen some infp on this. Sorry, you missed out while you wer in Greece.

11/26/2018, 2:03:50 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/AniOhevYayin

I love it. I had no idea. Thanks for the explanations.

2/1/2019, 11:23:18 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne1234567

Even though "spoon sweet" apparently exists as a name of a product that is obscure in English-speaking countries, the NAME itself is not a proper translation of the Greek, which would be "the sweet of the spoon" or "the spoon's sweet", neither of which is provided toward the translation, thus not a good example to use in training.

9/12/2018, 1:50:49 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Phil682961

It's pretty common though that a genitive construction like this in Greek translates to the use of a noun adjunct in English. For example, it would be odd if we insisted that "ο σταθμός λεωφορείων" had to be translated as "the station of buses" and that "the bus station" was not a proper translation.

9/12/2018, 2:44:45 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne1234567

Very good point, thank you!

9/12/2018, 4:04:01 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Have you not read any of the links I left where in very reliable English publications "the spoon sweets" is the expression used.

Really I tried to show you that not every expression is translated word for word. You have the wrong concept of what translation is. A language is based on usage. And if the usage in so many countries is "spoon sweets" than the expression is "spoon sweets".

9/12/2018, 3:07:05 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne1234567

Good to learn this, Jaye. S'euXaritw' polú!

9/12/2018, 4:00:36 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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Happy to be able to help. Suzanne don't you have the Greek keyboard? If you need links for the keyboard we have some ready just let us know. It's really easy to do.

9/12/2018, 4:32:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzanne1234567

Yia sou, Jaye! There is no Greek keyboard that comes up for me in the program. I use my laptop and do not own any type of cell phone or ipad (due to my background in RF/MW radiation bioeffects, Harvard). (Of course I use only wired internet as well.) However, I've been using other sites that have Greek keyboards in them and then copy/pasting into Duolingo. If you have a special one, please do let me know. Cheers, S.

9/12/2018, 7:23:34 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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It is very easy to access the Greek keyboard and it's easy to use. You just click two keys to change from one to the other. Check out these links:

https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/23430663

It's very wise of you to avoid the radiation. I wish others followed your example.
If you have any questions just let us know.

9/12/2018, 7:31:47 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dqJacO
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However long this may have been a Greek tradition, "spoon sweet" hasn't made it into the English language except as a novelty in some niche marketing and cooking circles; in general, it is an expression that will draw blank stares from the vast majority of English speakers, whether, when pressed, they can find Wikipedia articles describing what it is or not. (We do have expressions for describing food presentations like this, though, when we see them, e.g., "amuse bouche" or "palate cleanser.") We'll know what it means now if we see it in a Greek or other Balkan restaurant, and, if it will make you happy, we'll type "spoon sweet" to get through these lessons without an error.

7/25/2018, 11:33:33 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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If you just check out the links (and these are only a few) from the UK, the US, Australia... You'll see "spoons sweets" being sold in major supermarkets. They are shown on national US cooking TV cooking programs.

There is a section on "spoon sweets" in

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America https://books.google.gr/books?isbn=0199734968

So, the expression is indeed known in the English language. And for other info check out the comments on this page.

Amazon Buy Greek Spoon Sweet at Amazon - Low Prices on Greek Spoon Sweet‎ Ad www.amazon.co.uk/Grocery/Shopping‎

7/26/2018, 7:49:37 AM

https://www.duolingo.com/Fylakas

Spoon sweet is incorrect English in Britain, America, and Australia. The closest correct translations would be "preserves", "fruit preserves" or "spoonful of fruit preserves"

6/20/2017, 12:22:51 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/troll1995
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Wikipedia thinks otherwise.

6/20/2017, 12:28:53 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/Fylakas

The mentioned Wikipedia article cites no sources and cannot be considered reliable, especially when addressing something it opines is not part of western diet.

6/20/2017, 12:36:55 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/jaye16
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You have not presented any sources so it cannot be considered reliable that spoon sweets is not part of correct English in Britain, America, and Australia. Or that it is unknown in western countries.

Btw Greece is a western country. One of the first in fact.

Spoon sweets are known throughout the Balkans, Russia and the Middle East.

Here's a small sampling of sites from

the UK:

http://realhellenictaste.co.uk/product-category/spoon-sweets/

Spoon Sweet Sour Cherry 500g · Spoon Sweets. £5.50. quince · Add to Cart · Spoon Sweet Quince 500g · Spoon Sweets ... Email:info@realhellenictaste.co.uk*

Australia:

http://aussietaste.recipes/glossary/food-items-a-to-z/spoon-sweets/

Apr 1, 2014 - Spoon sweets are sweet preserves, served in a spoon as a gesture of hospitality in the Balkans, the Middle East, and in Russia. They can be ...

The USA

http://hot969boston.com/2016/03/29/springtime-snacks-greek-apricot-spoon-sweets/

Mar 29, 2016 - Our friends at America's Test Kitchen have shared another great recipe ... The serving of “spoon sweets” in Greece and parts of the Middle East ...

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Food and Drink in America https://books.google.gr/books?isbn=0199734968 Andrew Smith - 2013 - ‎Business Economics Tiny cups of thick, strong, sweet Greek coffee are the traditional finishing touch. ... egg on top;paximadia (the Greek version of biscotti); spoon sweets (jam-like ... See Page 879 in the index

Amazon Buy Greek Spoon Sweet at Amazon - Low Prices on Greek Spoon Sweet‎ Ad www.amazon.co.uk/Grocery/Shopping‎

4.8 rating for amazon.co.uk Save Time and Do Groceries Online Now. Free UK Delivery on Eligible Orders!

Just a few of the many. See above for images and a few recipes.

6/20/2017, 3:15:06 PM

https://www.duolingo.com/dqJacO
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America's Test Kitchen puts "spoon sweets" in quotes, which is a great big hint it's something they don't expect their readers to be able to make sense of without an explanation.

7/25/2018, 11:40:07 PM
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