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"They can go up here."

Translation:Ellos pueden subir aquí.

4 years ago

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/whrobbins24

I used "ascender," which has exactly the same meaning as "subir." Que pasa? I was penalized for getting the Spanish right but differently from the DL chosen translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/birnard

But you made me smarter by posting about it so now I'll remember that they are synonyms. ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanitaJacobs

Me too : /

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anish
anish
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It is accepted now

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I put subirse. It didn't work, and I'm not sure enough to complain.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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There is a meaning change when you make subir reflexive, mainly in that it indicates that the subject is raising or lifting itself. So if what you wrote was se pueden subir, then the primary meaning is "they can climb...", and usually that would be used to mean climb a tree, or into a car, onto a bike. Interestingly it also means to upload files, which is where I see subirse most often these days.

Would any of these fit here? You could possibly make a case that by "go up here" the speaker was referring to an airplane or a tree, but it would be a stretch.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistico19

¡Gran información! ¡Muchas gracias!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/luisguichard
luisguichard
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I'm a native speaker, and my first thought was "subirse", too. I reported it.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaxpur
Kaxpur
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Could you say ellos pueden ir arriba aquí?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelicaN8ingale
AngelicaN8ingale
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EN: "They can go up here"

ES: - ellas pueden ir aquí arriba - ellos pueden ir aquí arriba - pueden ir aquí arriba

(From a native Spanish speaker)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frank479

Gracias.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.qL5a
.qL5a
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That is my question too. It seems that we are correct but it is not accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Asienden?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmina1891

Ellos Ascienden (They Ascend)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hud214
hud214
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it asks for go and then only accepts come

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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It asks for "go up".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Some Spanish verbs' meanings include the meaning change that happens to an English verb when it is modified by prepositions that can also be adverbs, for example the word "up." So what I think Elissaf1 is saying is to remember that "subrir" means "go up" instead of just "go," and that a separate word for the adverb is not needed when translating "go up" into "subrir."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Confusing, but to say "Wait a minute, I'm coming!" you say "Espérate, voy!"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnyhewer

I agree. Direct translation of "go" is "ir".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MARILEERUSSELL

Another me too. I still have not heard why ascender is incorrect. I am not cluttering, just continuing to ask.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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Ascender just isn't used to mean "climb up" a hill or flight of stairs. The word is only a partial synonym of subir, and their meanings are roughly the same as the difference between climbing up (subir) and being at a higher level than previous (ascender).

The most common use of ascender is to say that someone has been promoted, or that something may rise to a certain level. It is also used as the word "ascend" is in English to say that someone has reached a higher plane of existence (He ascended to heaven).

Where subir and ascender share meanings is when they are used to talk about something climbing in number for example, but they remain consistent with their different meanings.

  • Dave, deben considerar subir su presupuesto de publicidad. - Dave you must consider increasing your publicity budget"
  • Ahora mismo no sabemos a cuánto va a ascender el presupuesto europeo global. - "Right now we do not know how much the overall European budget will climb to"

This is also where they are both synonyms of crecer": El Presupuesto agrario va a crecer el próximo año sólo un 0,5%, lo que es inferior a la media

So since this phrase describes an act of going up a physical location (here), it should be subir.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-HystErica-
-HystErica-
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"Ascender" was just accepted for me 9/23/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I won't argue. One synonym of ascender is subir at least per: http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=ascender

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1169485374

Who was the imbecile who wrote "go (up) here"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/attanatta
attanatta
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"Aqui pueden subir" not accepted 9.18.2016.

REPORTED AND FLAGGED

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bamelinlover13
Bamelinlover13
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How do you say this in the context of putting things away? Eg. "The books can go up here on this shelf"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I don't think (but I'm no expert) that the books have that ability in Spanish ;-) How about: Puedes colocar los libros en esta estancia.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noodle771

Omg this was tricky

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeeBrownst1
LeeBrownst1
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The English sentence is ambiguous. One way to parse it is to join "go" and "up", so "go up" is a compound verb (like "sit down"), in which case you need to use "subir" or a synonym. A second way to parse it is to join "up" and "here" so "up here" is an adverbial designating the destination (like "over there"), in which case "ir" or another synonym would be appropriate.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ForestMoods
ForestMoods
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Should it not be come up here i/o go up here?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrew.ols

Really? Suben is the translation DL gives when hovering over the word, and yet subir is the answer. Suben is not accepted. Quite misleading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/E.T.s_Son
E.T.s_Son
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I don't think its misleading because you know you have to use the infinitive of a verb if it comes after a conjugated verb. I believe the "hint" they give is just to show you the conjugated form of "subir" in 3rd person plural IF the conjugated verb before it wasn't there.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I had not really thought about it being a requirement that an infinitive form of a verb must come after a conjugated verb, and do I know that "haber" takes present and past participles (He caminado, había caminado). So, when you write this a requirement with all verbs, are you referring to verbs that are not helping verbs (like have and had) but are vocabulary verbs (for the sake of clarity, I am defining "vocabulary" verbs as all verbs that are NOT helping verbs)? Also, I want to add that I'm not writing about sentences in which the subject is matched with compound verbs in the predicate. Finally, I thought your idea that it was a hint was spot on. I'm going to make use of it next time I am trying to figure out which hint to use. Lingot to you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AyrtonSmith
AyrtonSmith
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I said "ellos pueden venir alto aqui." I realize thats not what they wanted, but is that at least understandable?

2 years ago