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  5. "אמא ואבא מרכיבים משקפי שמש."

"אמא ואבא מרכיבים משקפי שמש."

Translation:Mom and dad wear sunglasses.

September 14, 2016

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

Why did mishkafayim change to mishkefey, given that mom and dad arent wearing the same pair of glasses...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

It isn't meant to be plural, it's the double construct. One pair of glasses is also משקפיים. Like it's plural in English and French,as a pair.

In construct state משקפיים becomes משקפי.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

I don't understand. Can you elaborate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael112818

If you want to specify what glasses (like sunglasses) you put them in construct state. Mischkafaim becomes mischkefei (both words being plural)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

So you would never say mishkafei with shamesh?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Not sure what you're asking, since the sentence in this exercise obviously does use mishkefei with shemesh.

The "Hebrew construct form" (look that up online) is a "noun-noun" phrase in which the second noun modifies/describes the first noun, and is equivalent to a "noun of noun" phrase.

"משקפי שמש"
is equivalent to
"משקפיים של שמש"

On the other hand, If you're asking about saying mishkefei without shemesh, there are 2 answers:
..Shemesh tells what kind of glasses they are. Another kind is reading glasses, for which we use mishkefei with kriyah: מִשְׁקְפֵי קְרִיאָה
..Without any modifier, just a pair of "glasses", it's just mishkafayim מִשְׁקָפַיִם.

2019-09-05 rich739183


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luambatista

Mish'qefê Shemesh- מִשְׁקְפֵי שֶׁמֶשׁ 


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eitan11

its smichut because it shortens from something like משכפיים ששומר משמש


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

Taught here as a smichut because it shortens from "משקפיים של שמש"

2020-06-16 rich739183


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fellipemartins

'mishkAfayim' --> 'mishkEfey ...'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

There's Hebrew for you. :-) Yes, this happens in certain circumstances in the construct state. The rules are a bit obscure, so you'll have to play it by hearing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterAndro

Isn't it just because this is smikut?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

Yes. סמיכות=construct state.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

What does that mean though? Like what is construct state?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yomalyn

It looks like we will learn about this later in the tree, but here is a sneak-preview from Duo Wiki :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nRSZxX8G

In English I have the option to wear sun glasses or sunglasses, However proper English is sun glasses


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

"proper English" is the single word, sunglasses. Over time, the 2-word phrase has become a single word, and the latter is recognized in dictionaries. A google search on 2019-12-24 found the following:
About 14,900,000 results for "sun glasses"
About 2,110,000,000 results for "sunglasses".
That difference is so enormous that a google search for
"sun glasses" definition
got the following indication that the single word is the primary spelling:
Showing results for "sunglasses" definition (About 22,500,000 results)
Search instead for "sun glasses" definition (About 1,170,000 results)
Thus another enormous preference for the single word, sunglasses. In fact, even when choosing Search instead for "sun glasses" definition, nearly all results actually used the single-word spelling!

The primary listing for "sun glasses" on various dictionary sites is:
sunglasses on these sites:
cambridge.org
collinsdictionary.com
dictionary.com
thefreedictionary.com
lexico.com
macmillandictionary.com

sunglass on these sites:
ahdictionary.com
merriam-webster.com

2019-12-24 rich739183


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DennisMosesG

Doesn't שמש mean helper, as in Hanukkah, the shamash is the 'helper' (middle) candle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Two different words, written the same without niqqud. /shemesh/ = sun, /shamash/ = helper.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

I believe it means 'sun' like شمس


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rich739183

shémesh, sun, is a feminine noun:

שֶׁמֶשׁ

shamásh, the helper candle, is a masculine noun:

שַׁמָּשׁ

2020-11-11 rich739183


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JordanYehude

doesnt מרכיבים mean ingredients in hebrew too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Yes. There are two roots with the same consonants רכב, one that's around "riding", and the other around "assembling" (or did the latter evolved from the former? I don't know.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David629341

No ingredients is מצרכים


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I wouldn't say such a blunt "no". Indeed these days מצרכים is only used in kitchen recipes, and there English uses "ingredients". Even-Shoshan dictionary, however, says that מצרכים are generally "household things". I'm not sure if there's a clear English parallel for that, but certainly not "ingredients". I the missing link is a time, a few decades back, when the main use of מצרכים was the things you buy at the grocery, so "groceries".

Then English uses "ingredients" for other purposes, too - notably on the label of a food product for sale. For this usage and other similar ones, Hebrew uses מרכיבים. Even for kitchen recipes מרכיבים does not sound very strange to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/psheri

it's absolutely OK and correct and even better to say "Mommy and Daddy"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Correct, yes. Even better, I don't think so.

As an adult, I would say אבא, but I'd never say "daddy".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FarelRojas

Mum instead of mom??? I got it wrong because "mum" is the correct way, really???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Eeep! I I left off letter. It said incorrect then said it should be :sunnies.. is it 1970s Australia and I just didn't know?

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